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Opinion

April, 2017

Rockaway Beach

QueensWay makes its case against rail line

An Open Letter to MTA Chairman Thomas Prendergast. Comments (14)

January, 2017

The Civic Scene

NE Queens civics sound off about bioswales

In its November 2016 newsletter Maria DeInnocentis of the Civic Association of Utopia Estates questions the city building bioswales at the curbs in their community. Green markings indicate that the Department of Environmental Protection is considering putting a bioswale, or “rain gardens,” at that location. Comments (2)
Bayside

Scotch Volvo dealership’s plan for Bayside strip

(Re: Helms Brothers’ application to allow a Volvo dealership to operated at 207-22 Northern Blvd.) Comments (2)

December, 2016

Editorial

Banking on change

As we approach the new year in Queens, native son Donald Trump’s improbable victory as the nation‘s new president has made Americans more optimistic about the future. Comments (1)

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Little Neck

LIRR shortchanged Little Neck riders

In June 2016, the Long Island Rail Road closed the Little Neck Station east end pedestrian overpass bridge for safety reasons. The structure was removed Sept. 16.. A new replacement pedestrian bridge was installed Dec. 3. How disappointing that no canopy was included for both the new pedestrian bridge and staircases. Why did commuters have to deal with this inconvenience for six months? It created a safety hazard at the nearby Little Neck Parkway grade crossing with riders having to cross before grade crossing gates came down to avoid missing trains. Comments (1)
Richmond Hill

Indo-Caribbean women speak out against domestic violence

Disturbed by the brutal murder of a woman in Richmond Hill, two Indo Caribbean women’s activists organized a community vigil to discuss violence against women and mourn the most recent victim of fatal domestic violence. Comment
Opinion

Self-appointed child protectors stalk parents

It was the year of Pokemon Panic — any toy that gets kids outside must be stopped! — and the year a Florida school canceled its “Powder Puff” all-girl football game, suggesting the girls bob for apples instead. It was the year that we saw the first academic study of bouncy house temperatures — ”something that no one had really examined in the published literature,” according to one of the researchers. Imagine that. Comment
Opinion

In from the cold

Now that the holidays have arrived, Christmas, Hanukkah and Kwanzaa are associated with images of family and friends gathered around dinner tables to share the traditions that have defined their cultures. Comments (1)
Health

The dying deserve a last chance at life

A few years ago, a firefighter in Sacramento, Calif., Mike DeBartoli, noticed his hands cramping up. He figured it was a symptom of the job. Comments (2)
Opinion

Blizzard shared headlines in 1960 with new Pan Am terminal at Idlewild

By the Astoria Historical Society Comments (1)
Music

Taiwanese cellist directs Asian chamber music group

It’s been a long road traveled for Nan-Chang Chen, but the Forest Hills resident continues to make an impact on the musical world. Comment
Astoria

Astoria Heights Playground reconstruction underway

The Astoria Heights Playground will be closed for a year as it undergoes a nearly $6 million reconstruction, its first major renovation in 20 years. Comment
Jamaica

Queens artist remembers his Haitian childhood

For six weeks, Queens Library is featuring the artwork of Haitian-American artists for the Festival an Koulè (Festival of Colors) exhibit that is taking place in four of its southeast locations for the Queens Memory Project, which archives the history of the borough and its residents. Comment
Opinion

The wonderful world of scorpions: all 2,500 species

Stephanie Loria would like to set the record straight: “If you get stung by a scorpion and you are a healthy adult, you won’t die.” She paused, then added, “You may wish you were dead. But they get such a bad rap.” Comments (1)
Opinion

Clothing dealer’s find tells complex Holocaust tale

A 2015 estate sale in Long Island led to the discovery of a rare and alarming relic of the Holocaust—a jacket that had belonged to prisoner No. 84679 from the Dachau concentration camp. Comments (1)
Fresh Meadows

Fresh Meadows voices its concerns over new hotels

The civic associations in Fresh Meadows have been concerned about the use of three hotels, which are being built in the neighborhood. Noting what is going on in other neighborhoods of Queens, the Fresh Meadows residents have been fearful that the hotels might be turned into homeless shelters. At a meeting arranged by state Sen. Tony Avella, however, the owners of the two Marriott Hotels being built along the north side of the Long Island Expressway at 183rd Street emphatically stated that their hotels are being built as regular hotels. Comments (6)
Opinion

Making sure young immigrants are protected

Fearing the end of the DACA program, activists and universities scrambled to assure young people that they would not risk deportation under the Trump administration. DACA, which stands for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, is a program that protects undocumented individuals who were brought into this country as children and had no say in violating immigration law. DACA let these children work towards legalizing their status as well as go to school or join the military. Comments (4)
Bayside

‘The Americans’ films in Bayside

Filming for the fifth season of the hit FX show “The Americans” took place in Bayside last week. Streets were shut down as the cameras rolled along 39th Avenue in front of Aperitif Bistro. Comment
Astoria

Irish President to Honor Brendan Fay, Kathleen Walsh D’Arcy

An Irishman who came to America and an Irish-American woman whose family has been here for nearly a century are going back to the old country to be honored by its president for “sustained and distinguished service to Ireland and Irish communities abroad.” Comment
Opinion

Queens fights hate

This is supposed to be the season of peace and goodwill, but a series of hate crimes have marred the holiday spirit in Queens, which prides itself on being the World’s Borough. Comments (4)
Opinion

A unique publication leaves print behind

Out of the depths of the 1987 stock market crash emerged a salmon-colored weekly newspaper, The New York Observer, that animated and chronicled New York’s halls of power for almost three decades until its sad death last month. Comments (1)
Art

Good Enough to Eat: Gingerbread Lane at the Hall of Science

With Christmas just around the corner, one of the holiday’s most traditional features—the gingerbread house—is getting its moment in the spotlight at the New York Hall of Science. Whether you just want to have a look at (and eventually a taste of) some of those creations, or if you’d rather try your hand at making one of your own, there’s something available at NYSCI’s GingerBread Lane. Comment
Food

We find out the theories behind food fads

Okay, I did it. I actually gave my head a pitying shake when a friend told me she had just discovered a fantastic restaurant in Jackson Heights that sells the giant Indian crepes called dosas. Comment
Cartoon

Cartoon for Dec. 2-8 paper

Opinion

Stop-and-frisk provokes community controversy

New York City is failing in its obligation to include and inform the community on reform of the controversial stop-and-frisk program, activists charged at a town hall earlier this month in South Richmond Hill. Comments (1)
Letters

Remember Pearl Harbor and the heroes who died there

As the nation prepares to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the sneak attack by Japan on the United States at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, it is important that we never forget all of those who lost their lives on that terrible Sunday morning. Comments (1)
Political Action

Election results are bringing back student unrest

We have now seen a return of college student street demonstrations, in some ways similar to the street demonstrations of the late 1960s and early 1970s. Comments (1)
Music

Visuality gives music a brand new look

Multidisciplinary music ensemble CreArtBox, which is based in Sunnyside, will bring a powerful combination of various art forms to the Queens Theatre Saturday night. Comment
Opinion

Hunger epidemic in Queens

Two days before Queens residents flocked to stores to scoop up bargains on Black Friday, a new report said nearly one in six children living in the borough is hungry. Comments (3)
On Point

Trump could withhold funds from New York as sanctuary city

New York’s blind adherence to a “sanctuary city” policy will all but guarantee that a large portion, perhaps as much as 10 percent, of the city’s budget coming from the federal government will be withheld by President‑elect Trump soon after he takes office on Jan. 20. Estimated at more than $7 billion, it will trigger a financial crisis with far-reaching consequences leading to higher taxes and steep reductions in social services that will hit the most vulnerable New Yorkers hardest. Comments (18)
Health

On the holiday list: toy-related terror

Sick of being warned about anything and everything when it comes to the holiday season, especially all the warnings about dangerous toys? Comments (1)
Letters

New LaGuardia, same old problems

In looking at the effort to push LaGuardia Airport to the limits, it is helpful to be aware that the FAA has for the last few years been implementing a system in which separations between jetliners are reduced. What used to be 5 miles of separation can now be cut to 2½ miles by using satellite-based positioning. So jetliners are already flying closer together than in the past. Comments (14)

November, 2016

QueensLine

A November of tunnels, buses and conflicts

On Nov. 8, 1939, the Queens-Midtown Tunnel was holed-through at 11:45 a.m., when Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia, dressed as a sandhog, set off a blast that pierced the last 6 feet of rock. Postmaster General James Farley and Queens Borough President George Harvey were among the dignitaries who spoke at the ceremonies at the Manhattan entrance to the tunnel. The Queens entrance was still under construction. The tunnel opened to traffic N Comment
Opinion

Trump should be building a new America

I was sitting across from Donald Trump in his office, suggesting an idea I thought he might like. Comments (1)
Letters

Focus on local problems, not Trump

I attended the hastily put together rally in Diversity Plaza in Jackson Heights Dec. 9. Comments (2)
Opinion

Time for a truce

It’s time, Gentlemen, to lay down your swords and end the skirmishes that have divided the city and state despite their shared goals. Comments (1)
Flushing

LaGuardia pushed to its limits

I see the spin machine aimed at pushing little LaGuardia airport to its limits is trying to persuade us that the latest accident, the one involving now-VP-elect Mike Pence, was just a “rough landing.” Comments (4)
Opinion

Supreme Court on verge of becoming a political court

In creating a Republican form of government non-existent at the time, while our founding fathers did not agree on everything, they were uniformly intelligent. They created three branches of government: the executive, legislative and judiciary. They recognized the executive and legislative would be political in nature, but not the judiciary, which should adhere to the law impartially, free of ideological and political interference. Comments (2)
Opinion

Cartoon from the Nov. 18-24 issue

The cartoon from the Nov. 18-24 newspaper. Comment
Letters

A 2nd Wave Feminist’s View of the Election for President

Stronger together! Comments (3)
Opinion

A surprising finish to a contentious campaign

The 2016 presidential race turned into an unexpected upset victory for Donald Trump over Hillary Clinton. Most political observers thought Clinton would win. Some news media people seemed to believe that she would win by a large margin. Comments (2)
QueensLine

Maspeth Marine wins Medal of Honor

Lance Corporal Thomas P. Noonan, Jr. was a United States Marine posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for selfless gallantry while serving in the Vietnam War. Comments (1)
Opinion

No place for hate

Queens welcomes people from all over the world, but there is no room for anyone spewing hate in the nation’s most ethnically diverse borough. Half of Queens’ residents were born outside the United States and many came here—some at great risk—to find the freedom and equality they were denied at home. Comments (6)
Opinion

The unseen detours on the road to Yale

On Sunday I went to my local Queens bakery at 9, 11 and 2, and each time sat across from a friendly, open 18-year-old. These New York City students shared their hopes, dreams and what they do in their free time. One researches drone strikes in Somalia. Another teaches the disabled to ski. A third measures the size and shape of snake skulls. Comment
Opinion

We must protect historic preservation

As things begin to settle in Washington, the possible effects on the core issues of the historic preservation community and movement are concerning. The Historic Districts Council (HDC) believes that the protection and preservation of our shared built environment is—and must be—a shared civil right for all people, guided by community consensus and aided by government action. Comment
Bayside

House the homeless in shuttered hospitals

When Mayor DiBlasio had a Town Hall meeting in Bayside back in February, which was co-sponsored by Council member Paul Vallone, I came out of my advocacy retirement to attend. I raised my hand and was called upon by the mayor. Comments (5)
Editorial

The battle is over

The ugliness of this year’s presidential election bypassed Queens, where 19 races for congressional and state legislative seats were run with civility and occasional bouts of bipartisan fervor. Comments (2)
Opinion

It’s time to question the American path to power

In 1804, two American political leaders who really loathed one another engaged in a duel on the western banks of the Hudson River. Comments (11)
Letters

What is happening in Briarwood?

The head-punching assault upon Patrick Gorman, outside his apartment building at the corner of Queens Boulevard and Main Street in Briarwood, on June 26, 2016, which led to his death by homicide on the same day has just been announced to the public 4½ by months later by the major television networks upon the recent release of video surveillance by the NYPD. So, it takes over four months for an NYPD cam posted on Main to be viewed? Obviously, no real time viewing. Comments (1)
Opinion

Safety obsessions are getting insane

A squirrel chomped the leg of a senior citizen sitting on the porch of a retirement home in Deltona, Fla., last week. A television station there, WESH, reported that the victim ran inside, furry felon still attached, whereupon it bit two or three more seniors. Comments (1)
Opinion

Early voting is a process whose time has come

Early voting seems to have caught on with the electorate. At least 37 states have some form of early voting. Millions of registered voters are taking advantage of the opportunity to vote early. Comments (2)
Letters

Second Avenue shortfall

If Phase One of the Second Avenue subway opens by the end of December, or some time in early 2017, it is still a glass only one quarter full. (“Second Ave. Subway On Schedule,” Philip Newman‚ Oct. 28). Comments (3)
Letters

Give veterans the respect they deserve

As our nation prepares to celebrate Veterans Day Nov. 11, let us remember all of our veterans who have served in all branches of the armed forces from the American Revolution right down through the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Comments (1)
The Civic Scene

Is a green solution turning into a boondoggle?

A couple of months ago green letters with green lines started appearing at the curbs of some houses in Fresh Meadows. It took weeks of inquiry for us to discover that these green letters meant the DEP wanted to build bioswales, or rain gardens, in this location. Comments (3)
Opinion

Data shows Queens’ complex electoral map

With a contentious election just days away, some Americans are increasingly concerned about the integrity of the voting process as well as their access to the ballot box. Although for supporters of Republican nominee Donald Trump, this presents an unfounded and nihilistic belief in a “rigged election,” for some Americans there are concerns that they may face discrimination or intimidation at polling places. For others, a basic right of access – a ballot they can understand, is not guaranteed. Comments (3)
Opinion

Up for the count

If you’re not in it, you can’t win it, which should be the mantra for Queens voters in this unruly presidential election. Power Ball has come to the voting booth with the odds shifting almost daily as new polls are released and October Surprises rock the race. Comments (4)
Opinion

Gardens have much to teach kids

As a student of Environmental Studies, I would like to draw the readers’ attention to the need for nature-based experiential learning in children’s curriculum. In an urban setting such as New York City, it is critical that children’s learning experience extends beyond classroom walls and the limited number of field trips outside the city. One good way to make sure of this is to incorporate garden-based learning programs in schools. Gardens make a great learning resource for the children as it can be integrated very well with their academic learning goals and help Comment
Opinion

We’ve met the robots and they are us

We don’t kill off our retirees just because they’re not working anymore, so don’t worry about our future robot overlords killing off us humans when we’re no longer working, either—which we won’t be since robots will be doing everything faster and better than us, just as machines have been taking jobs from us since the Comments (1)
Food

Holiday time is time to celebrate

The holidays are almost here again…like it or not. So, if you’re in a party planning mood, or mode, here are some fun decorating suggestions and clever party themes, as well as a handful of easy recipes. Just use your imagination and shop local party or Odd Lot stores and home décor shops, to find great deals and get the best bang for your hard-earned bucks. Comments (1)
Food

To throw a party, you need a plan

If the thoughts of entertaining are keeping you awake at night, it’s time to master the simple art of inviting friends and family to your home. Comments (1)

October, 2016

Health

How do child experts do at raising their own kids?

In 20 years they can tell it to their therapist” is a line parents hear — and say — a lot. Comment
Opinion

This week’s cartoon

Editorial

Can DHS be trusted?

The city’s homeless czar came to Queens last week to face a sometimes hostile group of community leaders who object to his policy of renting rooms in motels and hotels without notifying elected officials. Comments (2)
Letters

Politlcs should be about public service

Politics used to be a noble calling of public service, but over the years, it has largely devolved into elected officials who are more interested in sound-bites than in doing the work we elected them to do. Comment
Opinion

Will Trump finally become The Biggest Loser?

Before people became ”brands” there was this quaint notion that the only wealth that matters is the “riches of a good name.” You don’t have to be religious to understand this. Comments (6)
Letters

Now is not the time to deport Haitians

To: John F. Kerry, Secretary, U.S. Department of State and Jeh C. Johnson, Secretary, U.S. Department of Homeland Security Comments (4)
Letters

Make investments in city buses

There are ongoing and future efforts to deal with complaints by various transit advocacy groups concerning problems with MTA NYCT and MTA Bus services and ridership loss. The Metropolitan Transportation Authority New York City Transit has already awarded contracts for $200 million to purchase and install a new bus radio system, along with $150 million for purchase and installation of a new East New York Brooklyn Bus Command Center. Comments (1)
Political Action

Don’t underestimate the value of the vice presidency

It seems that the tendency has been in recent years to downplay the value of vice presidential candidates. At this time, however, vice presidents have given an added importance to the campaign. Comments (3)
Opinion

Women just say no

This was supposed to the Year of the Woman with Hillary Clinton poised to crash through the glass ceiling—before Bernie Sanders, the private email server saga and Donald Trump’s unexpected burn-and-slash path to the GOP nomination. Comments (3)
QueensLine

When Pope Paul VI visited the New York World’s Fair

Pope Paul VI, perhaps the world’s most famous individual, was the first pope ever to visit the United States. On Oct. 4, 1965 the pope said mass at Yankee Stadium to an audience of 90,000 people. And to a country embroiled in the Vietnam War, Pope Paul preached a 15-minute homily on peace, telling the crowds that “Politics do not suffice to sustain a durable peace.” Another item on the pontiff’s schedule wa Comment
Letters

Trump cooks up another controversy

Notwithstanding independent corroboration shortly after several women alleged that they were sexually harassed by Republican presidential nominee Donald J. Trump, not only does he deny the allegations, he claims he never met some of the women and that their complaints constitute a conspiracy to deny him the election. Comments (3)
Opinion

The reason why some turn to child porn

In a St. Francis College classroom in downtown Brooklyn last week, a law professor dad introduced his son, now 30-something, and said, “I’m very proud of him.” Comments (1)
Opinion

LaGuardia Air Train faces almost certain delays

There is more to “A Solution At LGA” (Editorial - Oct. 7). The recent presentation by the Port Authority before the Queens Borough Board missed the current status of the accompanying LaGuardia Airport Train to the Plane project. Comments (4)
Opinion

Immigration is a two-way street

Contrary to hostile election year rhetoric, illegal border crossings from Mexico are at their lowest levels in over ten years. Supplanted by immigration from Central America and Asia, the decline appears indicative of successful efforts by the Bush and Obama administration to militarize the southern border. The impact however, is difficult to discern. Enforcement has put an end to over a century of migrant worker crossings in favor of an underclass of undocumented persons who are essentially stuck in the United States. Comments (13)
Letters

Who’s the real ‘Crazy Clown’?

There have been reports of “Creepy Clowns” trying to lure children into the woods. It’s an urban legend. But Sunday night on National Television, the world witnessed a REAL “Creepy Clown” in orange face paint, and cotton candy hair, standing on stage behind a podium, trying to lure ignorant voters into a voting booth. Comments (3)
Opinion

Trump’s towering flaws could seal his fate

When I was a young child, I remember the made-for-television tennis match between Bobby Riggs and Billie Jean King, dubbed “The Battle of the Sexes” in which the dominant women’s tennis player of that era easily defeated the aging male athlete after he did a lot of trash talking to the media. Comments (5)
Letters

A letter to young voters

I have been shocked and saddened upon seeing young people on television, when asked to identify the two candidates running for the position of vice president of the United States. None of these young people had any idea whose picture they were looking at nor their names. Comments (9)
Opinion

Haiti needs our help

For the Haitian-American community in Queens, there was more heartbreak last week as a Category 4 hurricane roared across the southern part of the island nation and left vast destruction behind. Comments (1)
Opinion

What’s behind the clown controversy

Let’s face it: Clowns are creepy. In a way, this current craziness has finally brought that fact out into the open, the way the word “frenemy” finally gave us a way to talk about something we all recognized but hadn’t acknowledged. (As did “bad hair day” before that.) Comments (2)
Flushing

The un-American message from Trump

The current blend of racism and hate that has become a part of American political discourse can be traced back to before Donald Trump became the Republican nominee for president—all the way to when he demanded President Barack Obama’s birth certificate, claiming that he was not born in the United States and thus constitutionally disqualified. This brand of bigotry grew when Trump announced his candidacy and in the same breath said Mexican immigrants were drug dealers, criminals and rapists. It metastasized through his many hate-filled diatribes, his belief that a federa Comments (15)
Political Action

Presidential debates have changed over the years

The long-awaited presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump has taken place with both candidates claiming success. Both candidates showed considerable knowledge. However, there were important issues that could have been discussed more in detail, including homeland security, immigration and military preparedness. Hopefully, at the next debate these matters will be addressed more than they were this time. Comments (4)
Letters

The ill and elderly need to connect with others

Sept. 11-17 is National Assisted Living Week, celebrating all adult care and assisted living communities across the nation. New York has more than 540 such communities, providing quality care and services to the elderly, frail, disabled and mentally ill. Comment
The Civic Scene

Special vacations for special-needs kids

Autism on the Seas was founded in 2006, as a niche travel company that organizes and staffs cruise and land resort vacations for families and adult guests with special needs, including autism spectrum disorders, Down syndrome, cerebral palsy and other cognitive and intellectually development disorders. Comment
Letters

All New Yorkers deserve to be respected

Xenophobic rhetoric has reached a fever pitch in recent months. Across the country, Muslim, immigrant and refugee communities have become targets for hateful speech and even hateful acts, including here in Queens. Comments (2)
Letters

Hold Build It Back accountable

I write today to respectfully request that your office commence a investigation into the misuse of federal funds awarded to the city of New York to rebuild homes in communities still recovering from Hurricane Sandy. As the Wall Street Journal reported last week, the NYC Build It Back program is about $500 million over budget, Comment
Opinion

A transit solution to LaGuardia Airport

The MTA should be commended for upgrading the service on the Q70 bus to LaGuardia from two transit hubs in Queens as passengers and residents struggle during the $8 billion renovation of the airport. Comments (1)
Opinion

Historic tweets that preceded Donald Trump’s nighttime rants

Donald Trump’s 3 am “Tweets that woke the world” wasn’t the first time a sleep-deprived celebrity shot his month off when he should have been counting sheep. Here’s a rundown of other tweeters in history who said too much. Comments (2)
Letters

Crowley’s light-rail solution is non-starter

Central Queens is currently in a state of crisis regarding its public transportation network. People from the area have to spend over two hours waiting in the crush of traffic to get to and from work, lowering their quality of life and destroying our environment. Comments (4)
Letters

Bioswales are bad news for Bayside

Maybe you’ve been puzzled by all the strange green paint markings popping up in recent weeks on sidewalks all over Bayside (and probably elsewhere). It’s about a new New York City initiative called “bioswales.” And it’s not good. Comments (27)
Opinion

Cuomo must clean up the cesspool in Albany

Look, Albany is corrupt. Everyone knows that. Here’s how to fix it. Comments (2)
QueensLine

How life was in Queens on the brink of war

On Sept. 1 Queens, not to mention the nation as a whole, was on the cusp of great change as 1941 drew to a close. Comment
Letters

Keeping America’s safe is everyone’s job

Bombs have gone off in New York City and New Jersey. The one that blew up in the Chelsea section of New York City had injured 29 people and the other in Seaside Park in New Jersey failed to blow up in time ended up with no fatalities. Comment

September, 2016

Editorial

A continuing controversy

Finding a way to make sure every Queens resident has a safe, secure place to live is one of the most important, and difficult, problems the borough faces. Comments (1)
Opinion

Uncovering why women cover up

This week, our columnist checks out the growing modest fashion movement. Comment
Letters

A Richmond Hill resident remembers

When I had moved from Clinton Hill to Richmond Hill in a house on 102nd Street in 1967, the 102nd Street station of the BMT JJ train was at the border of Richmond Hill and Woodhaven. The station was then structurally closed and renamed 104th Street. Comment
Political Action

Conservative Party gives its nod to Donald Trump

The New York State Conservative Party held a meeting of its State Committee earlier this month and by a large margin endorsed Donald Trump for president. The result is that Trump will be running for president on both the Republican and Conservative Party lines in New York. Comments (1)
Letters

Piecemeal fixes won’t make Queens streets safer

While I applaud the Department of Transportation for finally installing a traffic signal in front of the Variety Boys & Girls Club on 21st Street at 30th Road, the time of piecemeal fixes for this deadly speedway is over. The hit-and-run death of Sean Crume came even after the minor safety improvements DOT installed in 2015, sadly proving to us once again that we must completely redesign this street from the ground up to make it safe for all road users. Comment
Editorial

Fair warning

Incumbents, beware. Comment
Letters

Weather reporting is all too predictable

While the northeastern section of the country has been dealing with drought conditions for nearly two years, the situation has remained pretty much status quo in some areas. Comment
Opinion

The lessons 9/11 can teach us about picking a president

I remember being angry for at least seven years that our then feckless and incompetent President George Bush could not bring Osama Bin Laden to justice for his declaration of war on 9/11. Comments (10)
Opinion

Schoolhouse squeeze

Schools in Queens opened last week to a mixed bag of news, depending on just where in the borough the students started classes. Comments (2)
Opinion

The good, the bad and the airport

A recent New York Times description of LaGuardia Airport bore a certain resemblance to the End Times. As Patrick McGeehan reported on one particularly terrible, very bad, no good day last month. Comments (1)
Letters

Subways weren’t always air conditioned

Previous generations of subway riders would have no problems with 16 of 6,300 cars operating without functioning air conditioning as recently reported. Comments (1)
On Point

City schools soft on discipline

A new school year will begin this week. This should mean that our public school classrooms are prepared to optimize student learning. Unfortunately, the city’s education and political establishment continues to introduce policies that erode school “disciplinary codes” and “social promotion” protocols that undermine teachers’ efforts in the classroom and students’ ability to learn. Comments (11)
Health

In New York every season has its pests

To everything there is a season, especially if you’re a household pest: A time for mice, a time for ants. A time to eat wood, a time to suck blood. And a time for all those roaches under ovens. Comments (1)
Letters

Caregivers need our support

Last week, Mayor de Blasio signed into law two bills that take important strides toward supporting both paid caregivers and unpaid family caregivers in an aging New York City. Comments (1)
Opinion

Queens prepares to honor 9/11 heroes

The impact of the attack on the World Trade Center is still felt 15 years later in Queens, where streets have been named for people who died that day and families gather quietly to remember the loved ones who perished. The shock wave that shattered Queens after two planes hit the Twin Towers ripples through our neighborhoods again on every anniversary as a reminder of the more than 200 firefighters, police officers and workers from Queens we lost when the buildings collapsed. Comments (1)
Letters

City, state must foot bill for MTA fixes

Significant improvements for transportation in Queens are dependent upon both Albany and City Hall increasing MTA funding. Comments (1)
Political Action

Republican has a shot at NE Queens Senate seat

The 11th State Senate district of northeast Queens was represented by Republican Frank Padavan for 38 years, before his defeat by Tony Avella in 2010. This year Avella is being challenged by Republican Mark Cipolla, who is an attorney and comes from Hollis Hills. Two years ago Avella had no opponent in the general fall election, although he had a Democratic Party primary. Comment
Opinion

The TPP deserves a big thumbs-down

An Open Letter to U.S. Rep. Joseph Crowley. Comments (1)
Letters

Hosting an event is not the same as endorsing it

(Response to the Aug. 26 story “Pakistani Christians endorse Trump at Jewish Center” in the TimesLedger) Comments (3)
Opinion

A new season brings both promise and peril

I went for a long swim at a pond near my house an hour north of the city last week. The sweltering heat and warmth of the water belied the impending breezes of autumn and the back to school rush. Comment
Opinion

The wrong way to end bullying

I would like to comment on the letter from John Amato (“Schools should stand up to bullies,” Aug. 26, 2016). Comment
Forest Hills

Harps get hip

If you think harps and harp-playing belong to a different era, you haven’t experienced Erin Hill’s “alternative” take on the instrument. Comment
Editorial

JFK wake-up call

These are anxious times, underscored by the chaos and panic that gripped Kennedy Airport earlier this month when false reports of shots fired created pandemonium. Hundreds of passengers fled the terminal, creating a human stampede that swept along adults and small children. Comment
Opinion

Profiling moms: When is it OK to leave a kid alone?

This week, Lenore plays Marco Polo with her column. Comment

August, 2016

The Civic Scene

Queens state and federal legislators fight the problem of airplane noise

It has fallen on the shoulders of eight lawmakers to fight the airplane noise and pollution caused by jet airplanes in Queens. U.S. Sens. Charles Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand, Congresswoman Grace Meng; state Sens. Toby Stavisky, Tony Avella and Joe Addabbo Jr.,; state Assemblyman Michael Simanowitz; and City Councilman Peter Koo make up the eight. While other legislators may be involved in the battle, I have not seen their names in the papers recently, so pardon any omissions. Comments (3)
Sunnyside

Sunnyside quandary

All politics are local was a favorite saying of legendary House Speaker Tip O’Neill, who knew where accountability as a politician began and often ended. Comment
Opinion

City’s municipal ID program draws over 860,000 New Yorkers

An evaluation of the rollout and implementation of the nation’s largest municipal ID program found that it was an overwhelming success, a report issued by the city a year and a half since its inception said. Comments (3)
Opinion

City bail practices disciminate against the poor

In light of the Department of Justice’s recent amicus brief in Walker v. City of Calhoun arguing for the unconstitutionality of bail systems that insufficiently consider both a defendant’s indigence and alternative methods of assuring appearance at trial, I am writing to request that DOJ investigate the bail system in New York City, where thousands of low-level indigent defendants spend time on Rikers Island for being unable to make bail of $1,000 or l Comments (2)
Opinion

Is the walk to school really so terrifying?

These are the safest times in history, but if you believe what you see on television, they are not. Comment
Opinion

Puttiing up a roadblock against bicycle safety

Imagine asking Astoria drivers to detour to Staten Island on their way to pick up a relative at JFK Airport. Or requiring pedestrians to walk to Rikers Island on their way to Astoria Park. It would be absurd, and you’d get laughed out of the room! But that’s basically what Queens Community Board 1 wants the Department of Transportation to say to future cyclists of the proposed 31st Avenue bike lane, which would connect the East River and Flushing Bay. Comments (4)
Opinion

The fallout of Bill Bratton’s resignation

This week, our columnist wonders what is next for New York City’s — and America’s — police force. Comment
Ozone Park

Calling for justice

The arrest of a suspect in the cold-blooded murder of an Ozone Park imam and his assistant near their mosque has brought some relief to the Bangladeshi community in Queens, but Muslims in the borough remain fearful about their safety. Comments (2)
Letters

Let MTA pay for Bayside parking garage

There are other options to “Bayside BID pushes garage,” (Mark Hallum, Aug. 12 issue). Comments (3)
Opinion

College kids require course in ‘adulting’

Kids will start leaving for college during the next few weeks, and it’s nice—or maybe just weird—to know that at least one university is offering a new class this fall in “adulting.” Comment
Health

New York needs to create a non-smoking generation

First, count the number of libraries in your neighborhood. Done? Now, count the number of stores that sell tobacco in your neighborhood. Can you count them? Probably not. I was raised in Bayside all of my life. In my small, suburban neighborhood, we have a total of two libraries. Considering the size of the area, that’s pretty impressive. But what blew my mind was the fact that while Bayside has two libraries, my neighborhood has at least 25 tobacco retail outlets. Comments (3)
Political Action

Presidential campaign has its twists and turns

This year’s presidential campaign is very unusual to say the least. Comments (3)
Opinion

Put park safety first

Just days after a woman jogger from Howard Beach was found strangled to death in a Queens marsh near her home, a new report found violent crime has risen in the city’s parks. Comments (1)
Opinion

Family-friendly events bring communities together

This weekend, two family-friendly community events will engage Jackson Heights and Flushing with food, culture and crafts. Comment
Opinion

How Pokémon Go got turned into a threat

Our governor wants us to panic about a problem that does not exist: Sex offenders preying on kids playing Pokemon Go. Comments (1)
Opinion

Share the burden on helicopter noise

We are reaching out to you concerning the July 25, 2016 notification in the Federal Register that the Federal Aviation Administration is issuing a “final rule” extending the “North Shore Helicopter Route” for another four years without the normal 30-day notice that would give the community the opportunity to comment on this decision. Comments (2)
The Civic Scene

A failure to communicate about going green

Suddenly green letters and numbers have been appearing on sidewalks in front of houses and Cunningham Park on 199th Street. They are probably at other places, too. People scrambled to find out what these cryptic green markings mean. Elaine Young, first vice president of the West Cunningham Park Civic Association, searched the DEP website and discovered that they are for bioswales, which are also called Rain Gardens. They are supposed to catch and funnel rainwater into the ground. Comments (1)
Opinion

Breaking barriers

Regardless of where American women sit on the political spectrum, Hillary Clinton’s nomination as the first female presidential candidate of a major political party is a historic breakthrough. It only took 96 years since women got the right to vote back in 1920 for a female to be a heartbeat away from the Oval Office. Comments (3)
Opinion

Dreaming of a Trump dynasty

For those “Never Trumpers” still around, here is an even more dystopian vision than a two-term Donald presidency: a Trump political dynasty that dominates the 21st century. Comments (2)
Nightlife

America needs to keep its sense of humor

Just a few weeks after the terror attacks of 9/11, Gilbert Gottfried took to the stage of the Friar’s Club and explained he had to leave early to catch a plane to California. Comments (1)
Political Action

The vice presidency is no longer a secondary position

In presidential elections every four years, it appears that most voters vote mainly for the presidential candidate and have little interest in the vice presidential candidate. That may be true up to a point, but in some national elections vice presidential candidates can make a difference in the election results. Comments (1)
QueensLine

Astoria’s first subway line caused controversy

In conjunction with the Greater Astoria Historical Society, the Times/Ledger newspaper presents noteworthy events in the borough’s history Comments (1)

July, 2016

Letters

Putting the heat on Con Edison

With soaring temperatures, there have been reports of scattered power outages in various parts of the city. Con Ed is asking customers to restrict the use of all non-essential appliances during the day, which includes air conditioners, unless there are medical issues. Comments (1)
Editorial

Bratton moves on

Commissioner Bill Bratton’s decision to close the second chapter on his New York City tour as head of the nation’s largest police force doesn’t come as a surprise. But it creates a vacuum at a point when Queens and the rest of the city are grappling with a racial divide between the police and the community as well as the threat of terrorism. Comments (2)
Opinion

Do Republicans really want to build a wall?

Unsurprisingly, immigration is a flashpoint in this year’s presidential election, particularly with the Republican nominee Donald Trump’s signature policy goals of “border walls” and sweeping country and religious-specific bans on immigration. Comments (3)
Opinion

Mail-order marriages have their virtues

Years ago, when Marcia Zug read a GQ magazine article about mail-order brides, she was revolted. A high-flying New York City photographer, fed up with all the demanding models he was dating, wanted to find a subservient woman to make him happy. So he ordered a pretty bride from a foreign country. Comments (2)
Opinion

Civic associations improve their neighborhoods

In the March-April 2016 Newsletter of the Auburndale Improvement Association Inc. First Vice President Henry Euler told of several activities by the civic. He gave information about City Council Intro 446, which would ban the discharge, disposal or use within the city of New York of any wastewater or natural gas waste produced from the process of hydraulic fracturing, also known as fracking. Although fracking is illegal in New York state, this toxic wastewater can be sent into the state and could be used to deice roads. Comment
Letters

Vote your beliefs

All of the above words are, unfortunately, connected at this trying time. Comments (3)
Opinion

Studies strand transit riders

Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s $5 million study to look at the feasibility of constructing a tunnel from Long Island to either the Bronx, Westchester or Connecticut, which he proudly announced months ago, has yet to begin. There is still time to spend these funds for better purposes. The concept is nothing new, has been considered for decades and deemed unfeasible. Comments (1)
Opinion

Game changer

Republican nominee Donald Trump, in keeping with the new unorthodoxy, broke the rules at the GOP convention in Cleveland, flouting tradition by turning the political rites into a TV spectacle. Comments (2)
Opinion

A fearless investigative journalist and the lessons he taught

When I went to Columbia Journalism School in 1985, we were taught that good journalism “comforts the afflicted and afflicts the comfortable.” Comments (2)
Letters

Beat the heat while saving the earth

New York’s first heat wave of the summer arrived this week as temperatures soared into the 90s. Across the area, people looked for ways to beat the heat. Comment
Opinion

Pokemon Go gets the fear mongers going

By now even if you have not yet played Pokemon Go, you are more aware of it than your own breathing. You have read that the app has been more downloaded than any other app, ever, and that it has actually convinced kids to leave the house to go play outside—a miracle! Comments (2)
Political Action

Is the Ivy League a path to the White House?

It would seem that Ivy League colleges play a major role in educating future presidents of the United States. Comments (4)
On Point

Co-op owners need to protect their rights

In New York City, almost 1 million people live in co-op apartments, and many of the most affordable ones are in Queens. Efforts to maintain affordable housing in New York City are continually being challenged. Comments (8)
Letters

Give our children lessons in character

Our young people need more support and guidance in their lives. We are all aware of the problems that our young people have such as drug abuse, irresponsible sexual activity, high drop-out rates, violence, bullying, suicides and the rash of horrible school and gang shootings. Character traits should be taught in all schools for grades K through 12. Comments (4)
Opinion

A tough challenge

The assassination of five police officers in Dallas after the killing of two black men at the hands of officers in other cities has stunned and saddened Queens. Comments (1)
Opinion

What Generation Z’s eating habits tell us

You can tell a person’s age by his teeth. Comments (2)
Letters

How LIRR riders can get some East Side Access right now

A recent announcement by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority that Amtrak may be responsible for additional delays on the progression of Long Island Rail Road East Side Access to Grand Central Terminal project is nothing new. Insufficient support from Amtrak, including track outages and assignment of Force Account Signal and other workers, has been responsible for periodic delays since 2006. Watch for a future MTA announcement that opening day of service has been moved from December 2022 to 2023 or 2024. Comments (2)
Opinion

Supreme Court deadlock leaves immigrants in the lurch

Last month a legal challenge to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals deadlocked the remaining eight justices currently on the Supreme Court following the death of Justice Antonin Scalia in March. Comments (4)
Opinion

A search for the right college stirs up memories

The new buildings on campus are modern monstrosities. The path to the rocks in the gorge where we used to swim is roped off for safety reasons. Comment
Letters

Let charter schools use public space

Open letter to Mayor de Blasio. Comments (1)
The Civic Scene

More accomplishments for Queens high schools

Members of the Jamaica NOW Leadership Council visited Thomas A. Edison High School accompanied by Queens Borough President Melinda Katz and City Councilman Barry Grodenchik (D-Oakland Gardens) to highlight the importance of the school for the community. The school has 12 career and technical education programs, which include three-year automotive repair, electrical installation and medial assisting. The principal, Moses Ojeda, is a graduate of the school. Two students recently were the winners in the Greater New York Automobile Dealers Association Competition. Comment
Opinion

Remembering the legacy of Elie Wiesel

Elie Wiesel, the Nobel Peace Prize winner, bore witness for all of Queens in his mission to teach the world about the horrors of the Holocaust. Comment
Opinion

The other July holidays

Feeling a little down because the big July holiday is already behind us, with nothing to show for it but leftover red, white and blue frosted cupcakes? (And isn’t blue frosting repulsive? And isn’t that why the cupcakes are left over?) Comments (2)
Letters

We must take back our democracy

Britain has demonstrated democracy in action. The recent referendum on European Union membership enabled people to vote directly on an issue of vita l concern to their country. Comment
Letters

Street trees need to be watered

The thousands of newly planted trees that are lining our streets need to be watered on a regular basis during these hot summer months. These are all young trees with as yet undeveloped deep root systems, and they cannot pull up large quantities of groundwater like older trees, which have deeper root systems that reach down to that depth. Comment
Political Action

Libertarians are ready to affect the presidential contest

The Libertarian Party seems to be in a much stronger political position nationally in regard to the presidential race than it has been in past years. Recent polls show them with 10 percent of the presidential vote. Comment
Editorial

Battling guns

When defiant congressional Democrats sat down on the floor of the House last week to demand a vote on gun control legislation, the Queens delegation had a prominent role in the protest. Comments (5)
Opinion

Saying goodbye to our sons from another country

This week, Lenore makes a heartfelt farewell to her boys from Germany and China. Comment

June, 2016

QueensLine

Hello, Idlewild Airport; Goodbye, United Nations

Suppose you could afford your own plane and might decide to bypass the daily commute? In June 1948 Queens residents were watching with interest preparations for the official opening of the New York International Airport at Idlewild (now known as JFK Airport). On June 28 practice flights and landings began. Capt. Douglas Larsen piloted the first commercial plane to land at the new airport, a Peruvian International Airways DC-4. Comment
Letters

Albany stalls traffic safety legislation

We at Transportation Alternatives are outraged that Albany lawmakers have ended the session without taking action on a number of bills related to street safety. We are profoundly dismayed by the lack of leadership and cooperation in both the Assembly and the Senate to address urgent transportation safety issues. Comments (2)
Editorial

Saving the circus

The Big Apple Circus, which has delighted families at Cunningham Park and Lincoln Center for more than 30 years, is on the verge of extinction. Comment
Mayoral Spin Cycle

Thoughts of dad, and all he did

Tom cheers his father, a holocaust survivor who lost most of his family during World War II. Comments (1)
Letters

Abuse victims deserve their day in court

There is absolutely no logical reason why our politicians in Albany could not have passed that bill to end the statute of limitations for those adults who had been molested as children by pedophile priests and others. Comments (4)
Opinion

When tragedy strikes, the Internet looks to place blame

There was an outpouring of online sympathy for the parents of the little boy killed by an alligator at a Disney resort in Orlando last week, which just goes to show that sometimes the Internet has a heart, and sometimes it calls for blood. Comments (1)
Editorial

Queens rejects hate

Once again Diversity Plaza in Jackson Heights became the gathering spot for elected officials and other mourners to express grief at the tragic loss of 49 lives in the mass shooting at a gay bar in Orlando. Comments (6)
Political Action

A Republican candidate gets involved in the mayoral race

Looking ahead to next year’s mayoral race on the Republican side, one candidate will be the Rev. Michel Faulkner, a pastor of a Baptist church in Harlem. Comment
Letters

Gun advocates only see part of the problem

There are fantasies and then again there are fantasies. Those that are considered as possible realities by fanatics are not only delusional but dangerous. Comments (3)
Opinion

Footsteps leads to a new future for young people

Sol Feuerwerker grew up as an alien. Not “alien” as in “illegal immigrant.” Alien as in someone from another planet. Comment
Letters

Mel Meer will be missed on CB 11

As an 11-year member of Queens Community Board 11, I was disturbed to learn that one of my colleagues had not been reappointed to the board in April. Comment
QueensLine

Barbara Bush’s legacy had its start in Flushing

In conjunction with the Greater Astoria Historical Society, the Times–Ledger newspaper presents noteworthy events in the borough’s history. Comment
The Civic Scene

Schools need more funding for equipment and supplies

As our school year draws to a close, one must evaluate what our students have accomplished and what more they could have done if there was proper funding. Too many schools need refurbishing and more funding for supplies and modern equipment. Too many school use closets as classrooms, have laboratories which are just old, and have dilapidated halls and rooms. Comments (2)
Editorial

Honoring our vets

The Vietnam War has been on the mind of Queens again with recent events bringing back memories of a turbulent era when the country was polarized by the conflict. Comment
Letters

The Pan Am shelter has been a failure from the start

Since day one, the conversion of the Pan Am hotel into a homeless shelter has been an abysmal failure in terms of transparency. The de Blasio administration and the Department of Homeless Services blatantly disregarded various laws and even circumvented procedures to ensure the landlords and Samaritan Village receive their lucrative contracts. Comments (5)
Opinion

Saying goodbye to an old neighbor—and friend

When your grandmother dies, everyone knows what to do. Send a note, or at least express condolences. But when a neighbor in your apartment building dies, there isn’t really any protocol, maybe because there are so many different kinds of neighbors: The ones who live to clomp, the ones who put their garbage in the recycling, the “Hi, how are you?” buddies who chat for the length of an elevator ride. Comments (1)
Political Action

The 2017 mayoral race is beginning to draw attention

With most of the national political attention being focused on the presidential race, interest in the mayor’s race next year is starting to materialize. The incumbent Democratic Mayor Bill de Blasio is very likely to face Democratic primary challenges before next year’s city fall election. If he should be defeated in a primary election, it will be the end of his career as New York City’s mayor. Comments (4)
Letters

Help save someone’s life: Give blood

How would you like to save someone’s life? Life is such a precious commodity and I think some of us wonder if there is something we can do to help someone in need. Comment
Editorial

A fight for justice

State Assemblywoman Marge Markey refuses to give up. For a decade she has pushed the state Legislature in Albany to pass the Child Victims Act, which would remove the statute of limitations on underage sexual abuse cases. Comments (6)
New Voices

Asian American Groups Seek Redress from Government

May was National Asian Pacific Islander History Month, and against that backdrop, Asian Americans, both nationally and in the borough, are taking steps to hold the U.S. government accountable for historical missteps and current racial discrimination. Comments (3)
Letters

Will a Sunnyside Yard LIRR station ever be a reality?

Few remember that in 1998, as part of the proposed MTA LIRR East Side Access project, construction of a passenger station was considered for Sunnyside Yard. It would provide access to the growing Long Island City business and residential district. Comments (1)
Opinion

Summer’s coming—time to start worrying

This week, Lenore figures its about time she gets a new bathing suit. Or not. Comment
The Civic Scene

Abandoned houses are blight on neighborhoods

In every neighborhood there are one or more houses which are abandoned or partly built and they make the neighborhood look terrible. Some people have just abandoned their houses or they tore down the old house and started building, but either for financial or zoning reasons have stopped working on the building, perhaps for years. The neighbors are stuck with these eyesores and can’t really enjoy their own property. Comments (1)

May, 2016

Letters

Northern Boulevard has undergone many changes

Many of the Little Neck stores I patronized in the 1960s have become distant memories. During those years, my parents would send me to Mangel’s Delicatessen on Northern Boulevard at the city line. A dollar would buy milk, bread, a head of lettuce and still leave some change. Comments (6)
Editorial

Horse sense prevails

Mayor Bill de Blasio’s quixotic quest to ban horse carriages from Central Park appears to have ended with a quiet fizzle after he made it his top priority on “Day One” of his new administration. Comment
Letters

Remembering the meaning of Memorial Day

Memorial Day is here again, and I hope the many will not forget the importance of this day. Brave men and women have fought and died in many wars to keep freedom alive. These wars started with the Revolutionary War and extended to the war of 1812, the Civil War, the Spanish American War, World War I, World War II, Korean War, the Vietnam War, Iraq, Afghanistan and finally the war against terrorism that continues. Comments (4)
Letters

District attorneys deserve full funding

Our city is experiencing historically low crime. At the same time, we are reforming our criminal justice system to focus resources on violent crime and ensure people don’t face harsh consequences for committing low-level offenses. The district attorneys are crucial to both of these efforts, putting dangerous criminals in jail while diverting others to innovative programs like our drug and mental health courts. Comments (1)
Political Action

A high-stakes presidential contest enters a new stage

Barring a radical change in present circumstances, the major presidential candidates will be Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton. Both of them have huge name recognition throughout the United States. Comments (1)
Letters

Keep guns out of public schools

More weapons are being brought into our city public schools by students, and it is really a very bad and increasingly dangerous situation. How are all of these weapons getting past security guards who are in the schools? What penalties, if any, are in place to deal with those students who are bringing guns, knives and other dangerous weapons into the school buildings? Comments (2)
Letters

Bike lanes don’t help pedestrians

Mayor de Blasio has once again shown his total lack of regard and respect for the people of Queens, Community Board 4 and the residents of Elmhurst. Comments (23)
Opinion

A Hole in the Bag

The City Council’s narrow vote to charge the city’s grocery shoppers for carrying home their foodstuffs in plastic and paper is a mixed bag. Comments (2)
Opinion

Exiting wouldn’t change local sports’ place in my heart

My watch has ended. Comments (1)
Opinion

Swami dearest: Lenore chats with the Krishna next door

This week, our columnist visits with an old neighbor whose life tunred out much different than hers. Comment
Letters

Give bikers a fair deal

Apparently the folks at Community Board 4 like the idea of protecting the lives and safety of motorists and pedestrians on Queens Boulevard, but cyclists’ lives really don’t matter. Comments (6)
QueensLine

Best-selling author started his career in Queens

Best-selling author, sports journalist and musician Mitch Albom was born on May 23, 1958 in Passaic, N.J. Best known for his 1997 bestseller “Tuesdays with Morrie,” which shares insights from a terminally ill college professor, Albom is also one of the premier sports writers of his generation as well as an accomplished pianist and songwriter. He has founded eight charities focused on helping the neediest in Detroit, where h Comment
The Civic Scene

Can we solve the airplane-noise problem?

For decades residents of Queens have complained about the noise of airplane takeoffs from JFK and La Guardia airports. I remember attending meetings called by the late Congressman Ben Rosenthal at a hotel near La Guardia Airport. The only thing we remember about those meetings were people from Nassau County saying that they should not have airplane noise over their homes because they paid a lot of money for their homes. Comments (8)
Mayoral Spin Cycle

Tom’s eyes are opened during trip to Germany

This week, our columnist says we’ve got a lot to learn from our allies in central Europe. Comments (3)
Editorial

Justice for D’aja

A Rosedale man was convicted this week of murdering a 14-year-old girl who was riding home on a bus in South Jamaica after a Sweet Sixteen party in 2013. The senseless shooting sent a shudder through the city, shocked by the random nature of the attack. Comments (1)
On Point

Plastic-bag fee is victory for social engineers

The disciples of social engineering and behavior modification were at it again last week in the City Council with passage of the 5-cent plastic bag fee. With the mayor’s blessing, the New York City Council decided to add a few hundred dollars to every family’s annual shopping bill. All done in the name of the “environment,” a pretext to justify imposing new taxes and fees on already tapped-out New Yorkers. Comments (11)
Opinion

Here’s some new holidays for skipping alternate-side

There are now 34 holidays on which New York City suspends its street-cleaning parking rules, including Ash Wednesday, Asian New Year, Eid al-Adha and Diwali. That’s quite the holiday buffet. Comments (1)
Letters

Overdose of oversight

Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s proposal creating the New York State Design and Construction Corporation to provide oversight for all Metropolitan Transportation Authority capital projects worth $50 million or more is redundant. Comments (1)
New Voices

May Day celebration focuses on worker rights

Sunday, in a show of cross-cultural solidarity, approximately 50 Hispanic and South Asian workers rallied at Diversity Plaza in Jackson Heights on International Workers Day, to call attention to labor abuses and other harassment they face from employers. Comments (2)
On Point

Council’s ‘Fair Chance Law’ is unfair to employers

Regrettably, it is not an understatement to point out that passage of the Fair Chance Act by the New York City Council has put families living in co‑op and other residential housing communities at risk. Our progressive Council, that just voted themselves a 35 percent increase in a year in which seniors saw a zero percent increase in their Social Security payments, are moving full speed ahead in a dangerously wrong direction with this law. Comment
Letters

City streets can be safe places

Mujeres en Movimiento is a collective of almost 150 members, primarily immigrant Latina women. We are women who jumped the fence years ago in search of the American dream. We used to think that the American dream was having a big house, earning money, having a car. Now we know that it is something else. It is speaking freely amongst ourselves about the things that affect us; it is feeling that we have a right to our communities and neighborhoods. Comments (4)
Political Action

For democracy to thrive, the conventions must be orderly

We have heard, at least until the results of Tuesday's Indiana primary, about a possible contested Republican convention with Sen. Ted Cruz and some members of the Republican establishment seeking to prevent Donald Trump from getting their party’s nomination for president. Comment
Letters

All New Yorkers need access to health care

Queens has been severely impacted by our nation’s health care crisis. As of 2014, 332,000 people—14 percent of Queens residents—were still uninsured. Within the last decade, five hospitals (Mary Immaculate, Parkway, Peninsula, St. John’s and Victoria Memorial) have closed. With these closings, 1,054 hospital beds have been lost, as well as over 1,000 jobs. Hospital crowding is severe. Comment
Opinion

Want to live large? Start thinking small

Most people moving to the Upper West Side don’t expect to live in a mansion with a pool in the back. But neither are they jonesing to live in an apartment the size of a 2001 Honda Accord. Comment
Editorial

We’ve been Trumped

What started as a joke for many people has left no one laughing. Well, except maybe Queens native Donald Trump. Comments (1)
Letters

Have we already forgotten the victims of 9/11?

As has been reported lately, a number of monuments dedicated to the heroes and those who died on 9/11, are in disrepair and some have been vandalized. There is much disrepair and decay with these sites. Comment
Letters

Co-ops are the enemy of affordable housing

A recent StreetEasy analysis of all types of rentals has shown that the median rent-to-income ratio averaged 65.2 percent in New York City in 2016—two-thirds of renters’ income spent on rent. Although lagging income growth contributes to rent affordability, the problem is an effect of the depletion of rent-stabilized apartments due to co-ops, which have abolished a large population of rental units from the 1980s onward upon conversion of buildings to cooperatives. Comments (14)

April, 2016

Letters

Who decides when a student is college ready?

I’d like to address the current policy of Bayside High School with regard to students and Regents. Comments (3)
Opinion

Queens on a roll

Queens sometimes feels like the forgotten borough—an afterthought in the city’s public mind with Manhattan and Brooklyn grabbing the spotlights. But no more. Comments (2)
Mayoral Spin Cycle

What the elephants and donkeys left behind in New York

I’ve always found the image of the lonely sanitation man cleaning up in the wake of the circus an apt one for presidential campaigns. Comments (1)
Letters

Problems with participatory budgeting

This is in reference to your story in the April 22 Bayside Times on participatory budgeting. Comment
Opinion

Is there really an app for every occasion?

New apps the world is awaiting! Comments (1)
Letters

Homeowners should have a say in landmark designations

I have lived in Flushing for over 30 years and have supported the Broadway-Flushing Homeowners’ Association’s efforts to improve and enforce zoning and building codes, as well as the Rickert-Finlay Covenant. I cannot, however, support its quest to permit an unelected, unaccountable bureaucracy to usurp a portion of our property rights—that is, to impose landmark designation. Comments (1)
QueensLine

Borough president’s daughter makes her mark in space

In conjunction with the Greater Astoria Historical Society, the Times–Ledger newspaper presents noteworthy events in the borough’s history Comment
Political Action

How convention battles have played out in the past

As we move closer to the political party national conventions, there has been increased discussion about open conventions in which there are several candidates running for their party’s presidential nomination. Comment
Opinion

An unfounded panic leaves some parents shaken

On Saturday night at Cinema Village on East 12th Street in Manhattan, I met Marine Sgt. Aaron Rasheed. He was up from Virginia with his wife and three young children, including baby Elijah, who cried part-way through the new documentary we were there to watch: “The Syndrome.” Comments (3)
Opinion

The case of the four women who went to prison for being gay

It is hard to believe, but it is true. Comments (1)
Mayoral Spin Cycle

It’s time to return ethics classes to schools — and politics

Somebody had to say it, and Tom does. Comment
Letters

Students need schools close to home

How would you feel if your child was not able to attend the elementary school in his/her own neighborhood but instead had to be bused to an overcrowded school in another area? Comments (3)
The Civic Scene

Civic organizations shed light on important topics

A recent issue of Retiree, the newsletter of the United Federation of Teachers’ Retired Teachers Chapter, had two very interesting stories. One noted that Aug. 26, 2015 was the 80th anniversary of the founding of Social Security. Workers and their employees each pay a payroll tax toward the program, somewhat like an insurance premium. It provides benefits to retirees as well as to those on disability and minor children of deceased members. About 40 percent of the recipients have no other source of income. Social Security has a $2.8 trillion surplus. Comment
Letters

Making sure that the victims of crimes are heard

This week is National Crime Victims’ Rights Week. Crime victims have the hardest role in our criminal justice system. Many feel victimized not only by the initial criminal act, but by our court process. Victims are forced to come to court over and over again, without seeing any progress in their case, because of our trial delays. Comment
Political Action

Early voting primaries and their aftermath

As the primary season progresses, the term “early primary” has increasingly come into use. The primary election format has changed in various states. Comments (1)
QueensLine

When Shea Stadium was the newest game in town

In conjunction with the Greater Astoria Historical Society, the TimesLedger newspaper presents noteworthy events in the borough’s history Comment
Letters

Condos need to exercise transparency

I attach a letter from my condo board (informing condo owners at the Baybridge Condominiums of assessments they must pay to fund repairs). Comments (1)
Editorial

Remaking Rikers

He’s a reformer but not a New Yorker. Comment
Opinion

North Carolina ‘bathroom bill” causes uproar

North Carolina’s so-called “bathroom bill” is causing quite a stir—pitting defenders of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender communities against folks who think only ladies should be allowed in the Ladies’ Room and only men should be allowed in the Men’s Room. Comments (3)
Opinion

All school and no play makes Jack a dumb boy

This week, Lenore tackles schools — and how they are ruining our kids’ lives. Comments (1)
New Voices

Selective outrage distorts the victims of terror

No doubt many across our borough have watched the events in Brussels with anxiety, perhaps wondering if the events at Zaventem Airport could happen at La Guardia or JFK. We wonder if we’ll be safe in the subway—a system so large we could never hope to perfectly secure it. We spent most of last week going about our lives alongside police dogs and heavily armed police and to a certain extent, we’ve accepted it as the new normal. Comments (4)
Letters

The way it was in Queens Village

This Easter my wife and myself spent the holiday with our friends Dave and Marion in Bellerose. Comments (6)
The Civic Scene

Tax time has become prime season for scammers

There are warnings on TV, in the newspapers and even in the February 2016 Fresh Meadows Homeowners Civic Association newsletter about criminals who try to get money from you claiming you owe money to the IRS. These criminals use this scam around this time of the year. Comments (1)
Opinion

Hands off CUNY

As the April 1 deadline neared for the next state budget, it appeared Gov. Andrew Cuomo had backed down on his threat to slash nearly $400 million from CUNY in a move to force the city university system to become more efficient. Comment
Mayoral Spin Cycle

Tom wallks tall, with a big stick

This week, our columnist says it’s better to show your might than use it. Comments (2)

March, 2016

Opinion

Elder care: Where is the risk?

This week, Lenore questions whether we should make things so easy on our older adults. Comments (1)
QueensLine

Spring 1954 had good memories, bad omens

In conjunction with the Greater Astoria Historical Society, the TimesLedger Newspapers presents noteworthy events in the borough’s history Comment
Letters

Get screened for colon cancer

I would like to remind everyone that March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Anyone over 50 should have a life-saving colonoscopy. Comments (8)
Political Action

Front runners take control of presidential race

The presidential election of 2016 has taken a strong turn as a result of the primaries. It seems that Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton have emerged as the two front-runner candidates in the presidential race. Therefore, if they are the official candidates, for the first time we will have two presidential candidates from New York. This situation should lead to intense interest in the election. Comments (3)
Letters

The TPP is a bad deal for Queens

I am writing to express my deep concerns about the Trans-Pacific Partnership. Living in the 14th Congressional District, I urge my member of Congress, U.S. Rep. Joseph Crowley, to consider all the dangerous outcomes that will come from this trade agreement, and agree—along with the people he represents—that the TPP must be opposed. Comment
Editorial

The transit dance

As more residential towers rise in Long Island City and downtown Flushing becomes a blueprint for large-scale housing development, the pressure on the transit system to move more people is mounting. Comments (2)
Opinion

Wherever you go, Adele’s right there with you

Walk into the grocery and there she is. Shop for shoes, she’s shopping by your side. Need to cross a lobby? Drive to Jersey? Drink yourself into a stupor? My God—she is there, too: in the hotel, the car, the seedy bar’s seedy bathroom, seeping through the pipes. She is everywhere, always ready to start a conversation. Comments (1)
Letters

The Queens Library enters a new era

It is an honor to lead Queens Library in the important work of empowering and serving the people of this borough. I have lived in Queens most of my life and got my first library card from the St. Albans branch when I was in elementary school. My wife, Denise, was an active Friend of Cambria Heights Library. I know firsthand what Queens Library means to the life of our community and our city. Comment
Letters

Can the MTA keep bus improvements on schedule?

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority’s $202 million contract award for a new New York City Transit Bus Radio System to support a fleet of 6,000 buses missed some issues of interest to bus riders and taxpayers. The award is well over one year late, based upon the original baseline project schedule. Comments (1)
Letters

Tired of playing subway twister

I’ve been commuting from Astoria to Manhattan since the summer of 2000. Over the years, I’ve dealt with more service interruptions and fare hikes than I would have liked, but I have never experienced the level of overcrowding we’ve had lately. Comments (2)
The Civic Scene

High rents are causing small businesses to close their doors

The civic associations of Queens have always had a good relationship with the small businesses which occupy the many strip malls in and near them. Too many small businesses in New York City are closing because of the exorbitantly high rents that landlords are asking when their old leases end. The Queens Civic Congress, an umbrella group of approximately 100 civic associations in Queens, has long been concerned about the small businesses which serve their communities. Comments (2)
Opinion

A bold mission

A small miracle is in the works in southern Queens. Comments (1)
New Voices

IDC proposes solution for specialized high school diversity crisis

After yet another year of foundering enrollment numbers for black and Hispanic students at the city’s specialized high schools, the Independent Democratic Conference in Albany is taking a crack at reforming the admission process for those schools. Comments (4)
Letters

For a new season, try a new diet

After another winter of snowstorms and floods, I look forward to March 20, first day of spring, balmy weather, and blooming flowers. Comments (1)
Opinion

Beware the double-heart mark of the sex fiend

That headline is not click-bait, it is sarcastic. Comments (2)
Letters

Higher wages lift the entire economy

As a businessman and the owner of a small publishing house here in Queens, it is in my interest to have a $15 minimum wage. In addition to raising the wage of the most poorly paid workers, a $15 minimum wage will push up the wages of everyone else. That will mean more people who have discretionary income. Comments (3)
Political Action

Conservative Party plays a large, powerful role

The New York Conservative Party was first formed in 1962 and since that time has played an important role in our state election process. Comments (2)
Letters

Incredibly shrinking airspace

QueensLine

A son of Queens leaves unique legal legacy

United States Supreme Court Justice Antonin Gregory Scalia was born in Trenton, N.J. on March 11, 1936 and grew up on O’Connell Court in the Elmhurst section of Queens. Appointed by President Ronald Reagan to the nation’s highest court in 1986, Justice Scalia became known in his 30-year career on the Supreme Court for his religious, political and social conservatism, perhaps best illustrated by his originalist interpre Comment
Letters

Airport noise problems are on the rise

The letter from Sharon Pinkerton in a recent edition of the Times Ledger (“Keep noise down, efficiency up at Queens airports,” March 4) is not only misleading, but also incorrect. NextGen has not reduced the noise problems in communities surrounding JFK and LaGuardia airports, but actually increased them, despite the fact that today’s high bypass jet engines are quieter. And, this has happened because easy and safe noise abatement procedures have been abandoned in order to save on airlines’ fuel costs. Comments (4)
Editorial

Queens, take a bow

It’s official—Queens is a theater town. Comments (1)
Opinion

The revolution in Brownsville

This week, Lenore explores a new graphic novel about the birth of contraception in America. Comment
Letters

An unwelcome blast from airports

Sharon Pinkerton (“Keep noise down, efficiency up at Queens airports,” March 4) says, “NextGen reduces noise overall.” Doesn’t that sound wonderful? Comment
Letters

Support your community newspaper

Happy 81st Anniversary, Bayside Times/Little Neck Ledger and sister TimesLedger newspapers! Daily newspapers such as the New York Times, Post, Newsday and Daily News concentrate on international, Washington, Albany, City Hall, business and sports stories. They have few reporters assigned to cover local neighborhood news stories. These reporters have to compete against colleagues for limited available print space. As a result, daily newspapers miss significant news, civic, political and transportation stories from Queens communities. Comments (2)
Letters

‘Speedy Trial’ crisis in New York City’s Criminal Court

The right to a speedy trial is expressly embodied in the U.S. Constitution, with the Sixth Amendment stating “the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial.” But no one familiar with our criminal court, where misdemeanors and petty offenses are heard, can honestly think that this right is being honored today. Comments (1)
The Civic Scene

Don’t turn city hotels into homeless shelters

The civic associations of Queens are concerned about the number of hotels which are being built. There is concern that the owners of these hotels could lease them to the city as homeless shelters. Two small hotels have already been turned into homeless shelters. Comments (5)
On Point

Queens residents are pawns in a social experiment

When I ran for the New York City Council in 2015, the leaders of the Queens Village Civic Association (Nagassar “Ram” Ramgarib and Mohamood “Mo” Ishmael) and I initiated a months-long community-driven battle against a program conceived by Albany politicians to open a neighborhood prison on a Queens Village residential street. We organized weekend protests at the site that garnered more protesters and greater press coverage week after week. After a couple of months as the protests grew, elected officials took notice and joined in. Comments (18)
Editorial

Feud hits housing

The power struggle between Gov. Andrew Cuomo and Mayor Bill de Blasio has taken a hazardous turn, threatening the development of affordable housing in Queens and the rest of the city. Comments (3)
Mayoral Spin Cycle

Looks like New York values will decend on White House

Our political prognosticator says there’s a lot to like about Hillary — and a couple things about the The Donald. Comments (3)
Opinion

Lenore loves this King Tut tomb!

This week, our columnist sings the praises of Tutankhamun! Comment
Letters

In death of Akai Gurley, there were two victims

Greater New York OCA Chapters believe there are two victims to the tragic incident involving an accidental discharge that led to a young man’s death. An innocent father of a young child is dead. And the career of a young rookie officer is over. Comments (6)

February, 2016

QueensLine

Success on the silver screen for a son of Queens

Talented, widely acclaimed and prolific actor and director John Michael Turturro was born in Brooklyn on Feb. 28, 1957. Appearing in over 60 films, Turturro has worked with Spike Lee on nine features and has acted in four Coen Brothers movies. He comes from a family of actors; his brother Nicholas starred in the TV series “NYPD Blue” and his cousin Aida is best known for her role as Janice in “The Sopranos.” Comment
Political Action

The action heats up in the presidential contest

The political primary season has begun with Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders emerging as the big winners in the New Hampshire presidential primary. Comment
Letters

Pros and cons of Select Bus Service

I am writing to address the article “Bus lane cameras on Q44 Select Bus Service route worry community” (Feb. 5-11 issue). It’s important to remember that SBS was brought to our community because of need. Thousands of bus riders like myself are benefiting from these improvements—we often don’t have another mode of transportation. As a bus rider who uses the Q44 bus route and a longtime Queens resident it feels like we’re often left out of these conversations, like we aren’t considered part of this community. Comments (2)
Editorial

Keep Queens secure

The Obama administration’s decision to slash $90 million from federal funds to fight terrorism in New York City boggles the mind. Has Washington forgotten that the city is the No. 1 terror target in the country and probably the world as the ultimate symbol of capitalism and secular life in the West? Comments (3)
New Voices

Shooting raises questions of accountability

Last week, former Police Officer Peter Liang was convicted of manslaughter in the shooting death of Akai Gurley. The rookie cop had his gun drawn while conducting a patrol of NYCHA’s Pink Houses in East New York, Brooklyn and negligently fired into the darkened stairwell, ricocheting off a wall and striking Gurley in the chest. In a subsequent press conference, NYPD Commissioner Bill Bratton described Gurley, who was in the building to visit his girlfriend, as a “complete innocent.” Comments (3)
Letters

East Side Access wastes time and money

“MTA OK’s contract for East Side Access” (Feb. 5) is a glass half full. Since 2001, the total direct cost for MTA LIRR East Side Access to Grand Central Terminal has grown from $3.5 billion to $4.3 billion in 2003, $6.3 billion in 2006, $8.4 billion in 2012 to $10.8 billion in 2014. Don’t be surprised when it grows to $11 or $12 billion. Comment
Opinion

The old (wo)man and the dishwasher

This week, Lenore tries to figure out her new, high-tech, dish-dirtying camel tongue. Comment
The Civic Scene

Communities don’t want affordable housing

For months City Hall has been pushing plans to expand affordable housing in spite of the fact that 90 percent of the community boards in New York City and all the borough boards have opposed them. The mayor says that he needs new zoning rules while civic groups of all kinds in all the boroughs oppose the massive 483 pages he pushed through the City Planning Commission and now wants the New York City Council to approve. Comments (3)
Letters

The City Council’s pay raise is absurd

It can only be described as obscene that the New York City Council has voted itself a $36,000 pay raise, to nearly $150,000 a year, when the median household income in the city is just under $53,000 and the average cop makes about $60,000. Compounding the obscenity, the overwhelming vote came with exquisitely vile timing less than 24 hours after two police officers who’d gotten 1 percent raises (to $55,000 and $57,000) were shot in a Bronx housing project. Comments (4)
Mayoral Spin Cycle

Mr. Governor, tear down these sexist ads!

This week, Tom and his wife make a plea to Gov. Cuomo to remove breast augmentation ads from subways. Comment
Letters

Obstructing the choice of a justice

The sudden vacancy on the Supreme Court has been followed by an ugly partisan fight over the appointment of a new justice, to a degree that some of the loudest voices in the argument did not have the grace or courtesy to wait until the late Justice Scalia had a funeral and burial before they began to fight for the power involved in the next appointment. Comments (2)
Opinion

Scalia’s legacy

Queens was a footnote buried in most obituaries written about Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia following his death last weekend in Texas at 79. Comment
Opinion

Uncle Sam hands out scarlet letters

One day after President Obama signed legislation that will brand the passports of sex offenders last week, a federal court challenge was filed against it. Comments (2)
Letters

Guilty verdict in Gurley case is good for New York

The verdict is in. The jury has spoken loud and clear. On Feb. 11, in Brooklyn, history was made when a jury convicted a police officer of killing Akai Gurley, an unarmed black man. Our deepest sympathy goes out to the Gurley family, and we hope they can find some relief in seeing justice rendered. Comments (2)
QueensLine

The state of the borough’s real estate in 1959

In conjunction with the Greater Astoria Historical Society, the Times–Ledger newspaper presents noteworthy events in the borough’s history Comment
New Voices

For major transit problems, few real solutions

Anyone looking to take public transit from Southeast Queens to Coney Island can expect a sojourn of at least 90 minutes, from hopping on the A train, to transferring in Downtown Brooklyn to the Q and traveling the length of the borough. Rockaway residents, despite being just a stone’s throw away, would have to take two to three buses to get there, and allocate an hour of travel time. People in Northern Queens can forget about trying to use mass transit to get there, as it would take up to two hours and invariably involve having to route through Manhattan. Comments (2)
Editorial

Using horse sense

Hold your horses, Mr. Mayor Comment
Letters

Who will pay for costly Queens projects?

When it comes to public transportation, Queens Borough President Melinda Katz’s recent speech on the “State of Queens” made for some great sound bites but provided little substance. Katz failed to provide any specific information on how the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and New York City Department of Transportation will come up with funding to implement any of the following transportation projects advocated by many other Queens elected officials, constituents and transit advocates. Comment
Opinion

Will you be my Valentine’s disaster?

This week, our columnist breaks down the bad and good of Valentine’s Day. Comment
Political Action

We need to protect the heroes who protect us

Charles Lindbergh is recognized as the first pilot to fly an airplane across the Atlantic Ocean from the United States to Europe. At the time, in the late 1920s, he became a national hero. Comments (1)
New Voices

Lack of discretionary funding leaves southeast Queens in the cold

Queens’ reputation as the forgotten borough never seemed more pertinent until the weekend before last, as we dug out of record snowfall and waited well into the work week for the plowing of tertiary streets. While the mayor toured Ridgewood and Sunnyside, offering a mea culpa, members of the Queens delegation wrote op-eds and held press conferences, bringing attention to the situation. Despite loud complaints from at least two elected officials in southeast Queens, many residents felt their anger was not heard at City Hall. Comments (2)
Mayoral Spin Cycle

Time for pols to fix this city up

Tom Allon thinks the city needs to invest in itself — or else. Comments (1)
Letters

Stop converting hotels into shelters

Since taking office more than two years ago, Mayor de Blasio and the Department of Homeless Services (DHS) have converted at least nine hotels into homeless shelters, most of them in Queens and Brooklyn. There may be more as these conversions are usually made in a stealthy manner and some communities are not aware of the changeover until months later, as the residents of Jamaica Hills have recently experienced. Comments (5)
Editorial

Citizen budgeters

Queens has been on the front lines of an urban experiment: empowering residents to decide how to spend $1 million in taxpayer money on projects within their City Council districts. Comments (1)
Opinion

Ahh, the sidewalks of New York

This week, Lenore takes a walk on the wild side. Comment
Letters

Save the next Freddie

It’s a relief that Freddie, the cow who escaped from a slaughterhouse in Queens, will get to spend the rest of his days at a sanctuary where he’ll be able to enjoy the company of other cows. If you want to help charismatic animals like Freddie, please go vegan. Comment
Letters

A tale of two blizzard responses

Mayor Mike Bloomberg was in Bermuda when the blizzard of 2010 bore down on New York City, burying forgotten Queens residents under a blanket of snow. Comment
Letters

Cuomo has short-sighted take on transit

When it came to transportation, Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s annual State of the State speech had great sound bites but provided little substance. Cuomo failed to give any specifics of how he will come up with the $8.3 billion promised to meet the shortfall in his proposed 2015-2019 MTA Five Year Capital Plan. Cuomo is kicking the can down the road. Comments (1)

January, 2016

The Civic Scene

New bills require a push from Queens voters

State Sen. Tony Avella recently visited a meeting of the Queens Civic Congress and handed out a list of more than 60 bills which are of concern to the civic associations of Queens. A bill is a proposal but does nothing unless it is passed by the state Senate and Assembly and signed into law by the Governor. Avella wants us to support the bills we like by asking our local legislators to vote to get them out of committee, and then vote for them in their branch of the Legislature. Comment
Editorial

Speed the plow

Blizzards pose precarious challenges for New York City mayors when the snow piles up on Queens’ streets and the plows are slow to dig out residents. Comment
QueensLine

When the borough braced for World War II

It was 1939, and the sixth anniversary of German Fuehrer Adolf Hitler’s rise to power on Jan. 30, 1933 was at hand. The world was arming for war. In Washington, President Roosevelt proposed to Congress a $9,000,000,000 budget for 1940, to arm for defense and spend for recovery. Comment
Letters

Helping neighbors

At age 73 with a heart condition, I was bedridden with respiratory problems in my house in Bayside when the Blizzard of ‘16 struck on Saturday. Comment
Letters

Nanny state in full effect

Gov. Cuomo and the mayor decided to shut down all roads and most mass transit in New York City during our recent epic snowstorm. The mayor threatens to arrest drivers who disobey his edict. Comments (6)
Opinion

How to swap one food for another — and lose weight!

This week, our columnists talks with a man who has figured out the perfect diet — and loses weight! Comments (1)
Political Action

Presidential campaign shifts into high gear

As the Republican presidential primaries move into high gear there have been rumors that some establishment Republicans may be considering running their own candidate for president if Donald Trump gets the official Republican Party nomination. Comment
QueensLine

How a Maspeth boy became ‘The Last Don’

Born on Jan. 10, 1943 in New York City, Joseph Charles Massino is a former member of the Italian Mafia who was the boss of the Bonanno crime family from 1991 to 2004. During his 13 years running the crime syndicate, the powerful Massino was known as “The Last Don,” as he was the only New York mob leader at the time not in prison. However, he is perhaps best known as the first boss of one of the notorious five Mafia fami Comments (4)
Letters

Convenient bus service comes at a cost

Let us all celebrate the fourth anniversary of NICE bus, which occurred Jan. 1. Thousands of Queens residents travel via Nassau Inter County Express Bus to jobs, schools and other destinations in Nassau County. In addition, thousands of Nassau County residents ride NICE bus to jobs, schools and other destinations in Queens. Many transfer to the subway at the Flushing, Jamaica or Far Rockaway stations. Comment
Mayoral Spin Cycle

The media needs to start ignoring Donald Trump

This week, our columnist pleads with his colleagues to stop doing stories about GOP’s Presidential front-runner. Comments (3)
Letters

Meng is a powerful advocate for animal rights

Congresswoman Grace Meng’s continued strong leadership is evident through her support of efforts to improve animal welfare. The Humane Cosmetics Act is one of the Humane Society of the United States’ leading legislative bills for 2016 and its future success is dependent on co-sponsors such as Congresswoman Meng. Comments (3)
Editorial

Queens values

GOP presidential candidate Ted Cruz’s intended zinger at rival Donald Trump as the embodiment of New York values puzzled many residents of the borough, where The Donald was born and bred before moving across the river to Gotham. Comments (2)
Opinion

Finally, your Starbucks tutorial!

Now you too can understand what your are ordering at Starbucks. Or not. Comment
Letters

Playing politics with Flushing Meadows Corona Park

The TimesLedger editorial in its January 14-21, 2016 edition (“Parks, Not Profits), defending the integrity of of Flushing Meadows Corona Park as well as all urban parks in our municipal park system, is right on the mark and should be applauded by all who cherish parkland. Comment
New Voices

CUNY is vital to our long-term economic security

The City University of New York is in dire straits, due to political rivalries and a lack of will to fund these institutions at levels consistent with the 21st century. Notably, aside from chronic facility underfunding, many staff members have gone without raises since 2010, at a time when the cost of living has increased dramatically across the city. Comments (1)
On Point

Do City Council members deserve a raise?

This is what a classified ad would look like for the position of New York City Council member. Comments (10)
Letters

Commuters are facing a long wait for improvements

Remember over three years ago—December 2012—when the NYC officials and developers who broke ground for the new Hudson Yards project, which is to be built over the Long Island Rail Road Westside storage yard between 10th and 12th avenues in Manhattan, were all smiles? Comment
Editorial

Parks, not profits

Every piece of public green space is a precious commodity in Queens. At the top of list is Flushing Meadows Corona Park, a sprawling 900-acre expanse that plays host to the US Open, Citi Field and the ambitions of developers who want to build a mall on a parcel outside the ballpark. Comment
Opinion

Play dates and the end of play

This week, our columnist ponders the benefits of adult-supervised playtime. Comments (1)
Letters

Bring city shelters up to standards

Gilbert Taylor, former commissioner of the Department of Homeless Services, has voluntarily or involuntarily resigned. Regardless, this is a much-needed change, which provides the city with an opportunity to rectify some of his poor decisions as well as reform the agency to effectively help those in need. Comments (2)
Letters

The city must ensure elevator safety

The recent tragic death of a young man due to an elevator malfunction should certainly not have occurred, but that should be a wake-up call to inspect every single elevator in every city housing project in all five boroughs immediately! Comments (2)
Political Action

Radio program tunes in to the big issues

Every Sunday morning a radio interview program on 970 AM is hosted by John Catsimatidis from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. It started out as a small enterprise about a year ago and is now considered a major weekend interview program. Comment
Letters

House the homeless

Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s idea to house the homeless at Creedmoor has been unofficially dropped. My wife and I live a few blocks from Creedmoor Psychiatric Center in Queens Village. We therefore have been concerned over this proposal. I’m not biased against the homeless, for I was homeless 40 years ago and I do feel their pain and loneliness and desperation. Yet temporary shelters are costly and do not solve the problem. Comments (6)
Mayoral Spin Cycle

Picking winners in the presidential horse race

When I was growing up on the Upper West Side, I was a huge sports fan, my mood fluctuating with the fortunes of the Mets and Knicks. On days when one of my teams was playing, I had a frisson of anticipation lifting my already youthful optimism. Comments (3)
Letters

A theater struggles to stay in Queens

The Chain Theatre opened its doors days after Hurricane Sandy. When looking back at that time, Artistic Director Kirk Gostkowski remembers late nights passing the black Manhattan skyline still waiting for power, crammed roadways, searching for gas and sore muscles from laying plywood for the new flooring. As New Yorkers know, Hurricane Sandy brought the city to a standstill, which caused our hired contractors to walk out on the job. With time and money running tight, it was up to the artistic team to trudge through the chaos and finish the build. Comments (1)
Editorial

The west gone wild

Western Queens is turning into Dodge City, a wicked part of town where urban cowboys let off steam after taking the trail from Manhattan to the outer borough. Many of the same temptations that made the 19th-century cowtown infamous lure the 21st-century dudes to Long Island City and Maspeth: women, booze and guns. Add drugs to the mixture and the late night crime stats are ready to roll. Comments (1)
Opinion

Two hours to a better you this new year

This week, our columnist guarantees a successfull New Year’s resolution. Comment
Letters

Parks need the council’s support

One need not be surprised. U.S. Rep. Joe Crowley (D-Jackson Heights) and City Council members Karen Koslowitz (D-Forest Hills), Julissa Ferreras-Copeland (D-East Elmhurst) and Peter Koo (D-Flushing) support allowing private for-profit companies to use Flushing Meadows Corona Park for music events that will require paid admissions. Comment

December, 2015

Opinion

So now, Jews can get into Heaven? As if I didn’t have enough to worry about!

This week, Lenore contemplates the afterlife. Comments (3)
Community News Group