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Berger’s Burg: Celebrating the joy of the Easter egg

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A rooster was strutting around the barnyard on Easter Sunday morning and came across a nest of eggs dyed the colors of the rainbow. The rooster took one look at the colorful display, ran out the barn door and beat the feathers off the peacock.

Yes, dear readers, Easter Sunday and the Easter egg will be arriving again April 23. Of all the symbols associated with Easter, the egg, a token of fertility and new life, is the most identifiable. The customs and traditions of using eggs have been connected with Easter for centuries.

In ancient times, Easter eggs were specifically painted with bright colors to represent the sunlight of spring. They were used in egg-rolling contests, given as gifts and exchanged by lovers and romantic admirers, much the same as valentines are given today. (To tell you the truth, I would much rather receive an egg from Gloria than a Valentine

Posted 7:03 pm, October 10, 2011
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