Sections

Transit Authority pulls high-tech subway cars

Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Get our stories in your inbox, free.

Like TimesLedger on Facebook.

About 140 cars taken out of service...

By Philip Newman

The Transit Authority is checking over scores of new high-tech subway cars recently withdrawn from service in an effort to fix problems ranging from out-of-sync automatic announcements to door and braking glitches.

About 140 cars taken out of service last month were part of the first shipment of the new, state-of-the-art cars manufactured by the Japanese company Kawasaki and Bombardier of Canada.

A Transit Authority official said that among the problems found in the withdrawn cars were faulty automatic announcements and electronic maps, doors that either failed to completely close or became stuck and cars that did not brake as quickly as they should have.

Some of the new cars, designated R142 and R142A, are expected to replace the famous, 40-year-old redbird cars so familiar on the No. 7 line.

A number of the withdrawn cars have already been returned to the tracks.

The entire fleet of 1,080 futuristic subway cars built by Kawasaki and Bombardier at a cost of $1.4 million is expected to be in service within the next year.

Today’s news:
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Get our stories in your inbox, free.

Like TimesLedger on Facebook.

Reader Feedback

Enter your comment below

By submitting this comment, you agree to the following terms:

You agree that you, and not TimesLedger.com or its affiliates, are fully responsible for the content that you post. You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening or sexually-oriented material or any material that may violate applicable law; doing so may lead to the removal of your post and to your being permanently banned from posting to the site. You grant to TimesLedger.com the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual and fully sublicensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part world-wide and to incorporate it in other works in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

CNG: Community Newspaper Group