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Born-and-bred Baysider shows how to succeed

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Bayside native Jeff Rosenblum dedicates his new book, “Work Smart and Succeed” to his parents “first and foremost,” and “to the thousands of people with whom I have worked throughout my career and whose examples were the inspiration for this effort.”

The effort is a self-improvement guide on how to do better in work — and in life.

Rosenblum, who now lives in Manhattan, had moved up within eight years to a vice-president’s spot in advertising while working at some of the largest such firms in the world. He has now ventured out on his own, advertising himself as an author and speaker.

The book offers “lessons and examples on how to succeed in you career. It’s intended for everyone,” he said.

Rosenblum begins the 72-page book by stressing that “a valuable thing to know in work, and in life, is who you are. Not who you want to be or who you wish you were, but who you actually are deep down in your soul.” The idea is that you should take stock of your strengths, and just as importantly, your weaknesses.

As he does throughout the book, Rosenblum gives examples from situations and people he’s known (with fictitious names, of course). He cites what “Stan” experienced when he didn’t realize his weakness in math, and stubbornly would refrain from asking anyone for help. “Therefore, he made several critical mistakes early on that placed him on the wrong side of his managers.” Eventually, he was let go.

“Katie” on the other hand, entering the company in the same position, knew that math was not her strong point, and asked for help when she needed it. “Katie parlayed her strengths, worked on her weaknesses, and quickly earned a promotion.”

This strong-weak analysis actually can be applied to the book itself. It has some weak points — some of the advice and phrases are very much cliched, such as “Do not burn any bridges” or “Things always look better when the glass is half-full.”

But its strength — which is enough to make the book quite worthwhile — is its emphasis on effective ways to deal with people, with different situations, and with oneself (which may be the hardest thing). Rosenblum stresses that whether a fellow employee is an entry-level worker on the first day, or the president of the company, he or she, above all, needs to be treated with respect — a commodity which spreads easily.

“Work Smart and Succeed” can be ordered online at www.worksmartandsucceed.com or by calling or faxing 212-679-5664.

Reach Qguide Editor David Glenn by e-mail at glenn@timesledger.com or call 229-0300, Ext. 139.

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