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LIJ merges once-separate pediatric departments

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In an effort to improve pediatric care at the North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System, the hospital chain announced last week it was combining its children’s heath services into a single department.

The hospital chain merged Schneider’s Children’s Hospital in New Hyde Park and the Department of Pediatrics of the North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset L.I.. The pediatrics department at North Shore will be now known as the Schneider Children’s Hospital at North Shore.

“This initiative brings together the talent and dedication of the staffs at two of our major institutions to provide the most advanced and comprehensive health care to children,” said Michael Dowling, president and chief executive officer of the North Shore-LIJ Health System.

“Patients and their families will reap the benefits of the quality and number of pediatric subspecial­ties,” he said, “while continuing to access the vast resources of the North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System.”

The joining of the two hospitals into one department will be a sizable benefit for the system, he said.

Dr. Philip Lanzkowsky, chief of staff at Schneider and the vice president of the system’s children’s health network, said breakthroughs and advancements in the medical field occur when experts join forces to share information, resources and creativity, which benefit the patient.

“With a unified pediatric department, there is increased clinical integration and enhanced teaching,” he said. “The merging of the training programs between both hospitals will result in the largest general pediatric residency program in the country in 2003.”

The North Shore-LIJ Health System is a group of 18 hospitals throughout Queens, Long Island and Staten Island. Its three main health-care facilities are Long Island Jewish Medical Center in New Hyde Park, North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset and the Staten Island University Hospital North Division.

Schneider Children’s Hospital in New Hyde Park is a full-service comprehensive hospital that cares for children from infants to young adults. The 154-bed hospital treats childhood diseases ranging from cancer to epilepsy. It is part of LIJ Medical Center, an 829-bed facility on the Queens-Nassau boarder, which also includes Long Island Jewish Hospital and Hillside Hospital.

Lanzkowsky said combining the forces of both medical facilities opens up avenues and opportunities for joint research projects within the large pediatric population. In addition, he said the health system can better manage costs and raise the level of patient care in both hospitals.

Working in the pediatric department will be 130 full-time faculty members, 1,000 voluntary pediatricians, 200 residents and fellows, and hundreds of nurses, technicians, social workers, child life specialist and other support staff.

Reach reporter Adam Kramer by e-mail at Timesledgr@aol.com or call 229-0300, Ext. 157.

Posted 7:02 pm, October 10, 2011
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