Sections

Construction rules issued for Douglas Manor

Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Get our stories in your inbox, free.

Like TimesLedger on Facebook.

Living in a historic neighborhood may have its charms, but there does not seem to be anything appealing about the construction rules governing homeowners in city landmarked areas.

High-end Douglas Manor has been a city landmark district since 1997, but it was not until this week that the city Landmarks Preservation Commission issued a draft of its “master plan” for construction in the neighborhood, regulating everything from landscaping to building additions to a home.

The public is being given a chance to comment on the extensive construction rules at an Oct. 1 Landmarks Preservation Commission public hearing in Manhattan.

“The objective of the District Master Plan is to provide owners, architects and store tenants with design criteria which will allow timely review of proposed alterations while protecting the architecturally and historically significant features of the buildings and historic district’s sense of place,” the commission said in a notice about the public hearing.

Douglas Manor has been a city landmarked district since 1997, and includes about 600 homes on a tiny peninsula jutting out into Little Neck Bay. The neighborhood, which the Landmarks Preservation Commission described as an example of an early 20th century planned suburb on a 19th century estate, was laid out in 1906.

The Douglaston Historic District, as it is called by the city, is one of only five in Queens, including Fort Totten, Jackson Heights, Stockholm Street and Hunter’s Point. Adjacent to the Douglas Manor historic district, the neighborhood of Douglaston Hill has received landmark status from the state and was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2000.

Because Douglas Manor is a city landmark, the Landmarks Preservation Commission must approve construction and landscaping work in the area to preserve the character of the neighborhood. Construction rules are more flexible for buildings constructed after Dec. 31, 1944, the commission said, because those buildings “do not make a significant contribution to the historic district.”

Because building owners must submit an application to the city to get approval for construction work in the landmarked neighborhoods, the commission has asked applicants to go through the Douglas Manor Association beforehand.

Bernard Haber, a Douglas Manor resident and former chairman of Community Board 11, is head of the Douglas Manor Association. Haber said Monday he had not viewed the master plan rules but that residents should take notice of the plan.

“They are the rules and regulations as to what you can do and can’t do in a landmarked district,” Haber said.

The master plan includes regulations for building additions, window replacement, landscaping, heating, venting and air conditioning, and “work on or affecting significant landscape improvements,” the commission said.

Reach reporter Kathianne Boniello by e-mail at Timesledgr@aol.com or call 229-0300, Ext 146.

Today’s news:
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Get our stories in your inbox, free.

Like TimesLedger on Facebook.

Reader Feedback

Enter your comment below

By submitting this comment, you agree to the following terms:

You agree that you, and not TimesLedger.com or its affiliates, are fully responsible for the content that you post. You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening or sexually-oriented material or any material that may violate applicable law; doing so may lead to the removal of your post and to your being permanently banned from posting to the site. You grant to TimesLedger.com the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual and fully sublicensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part world-wide and to incorporate it in other works in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

This week’s featured advertisers

CNG: Community Newspaper Group