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Lecture explores how Ice Age shaped modern-day Queens

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Hadley’s presentation was designed to make the geology of the borough accessible to the lay person while presenting scientific facts about the borough’s early days.

Highlights of the slide/video presentation included recent slides of Alaskan glaciers and an autumn video aerial tour of the Terminal Moraine from Staten Island’s Todt Hill, across the Verrazano Narrows Bridge on Marathon Sunday, over Prospect Park and into Queens.

The lecture took place at GAHS on June 2. The historical society is located in Quinn’s Gallery, 35-20 Broadway in Long Island City. For more information, call the historical society at 718-278-0700 or go to www.astorialic.org.

Using a volunteer and a few household items, pop geologist Fred Hadley (r.) shows how a gigantic glacier helped shape the terrain of modern-day Queens during his slide lecture “Queens: The Ice Age Stopped Here” at the Greater Astoria Historical Society last week. Photo by Dan Havlik

Posted 7:07 pm, October 10, 2011
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