Paclo: Go to Paclo for some Southern/West Indian fare

Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook

Get our stories in your inbox, free.

Like TimesLedger on Facebook.

Paclo is a Southern/West Indian bakery/restaurant that opened in April. The “Grand Opening” sign still proudly stretches across the store front from side to side, over two feet high — absolutely the largest I’ve ever encountered.

Paclo sparkles with newness. One side is a bakery and a serving counter with a low wrought iron fence smack down the middle — bakery on the left, dining area on the right. Dark green marble counters for the bakery and food section add class. There are a few booths plus tables and chairs with colorful paintings of West Indian scenes hanging on the wall. A white ceramic tile floor adds a handsome accent.

The owner had a restaurant in Miami and in Tampa, and Paclo is the first up north with a second in Brooklyn in the planning stage. Breakfast, lunch and dinner is offered for eat-in or take-out. The cooks are three — Jacqueline, Clair and Shoune.

Come early for supper when the choice is greatest. I had a savory West Indian stew of meat with spinach, okra and potato. With it comes rice, a choice of three: rice and beans; a “pilaf” with peas and green beans; and limas and white rice. The “pilaf” was delicious. You’re given a “Say when” serving of rice plus a salad.

I spied potato salad, which looked intriguing. It was a mayonnaise type with a delightful hotness to it. Select from the array displayed and tote your tray back to the table.

With it, I sipped a cool drink from the refrigerated case. Pat’s gourmet beverages come in a milky white rectangular container with an attractive green label. Sour sop is a prized drink in the Caribbean and much sought here. This version uses evaporated milk, and I was surprised — I liked it better than previous punch-like versions I had had before. Pat has other exotica, and I’d like to try them all. Even at $3 a serving, I think they’re worth every sip.

For dessert, peruse the up front bakery/coffee station. Longue de boeuf looked yummy — squares of puff pastry sprinkled with sugar and cinnamon. It reminded me of mother-made goodies of long ago. And, for “scientific purposes” in writing this review, I sampled a cheese-topped pastry. The combination of a cheddar cheese with pastry excites my palate. Sorry, this didn’t.

My dining companion tried what was identified as “what we call lambi.” New to me, but my companion, who visits grandchildren in Florida, took one bite and identified as conch. She loves rice and beans, and chose it. A plantain slice, dipped in batter and fried to a golden brown, complimented it along with a tossed green salad. Her beverage was Pat’s cucumber drink, which I thought sensational and expect to take out for some entertaining. My dining companion’s go-along finale with tea, served with a lemon wedge, was cookies — a mini linzer cookie with the red jam cut out and a buttery round. She bemoaned that the freezer was being scrubbed. No moose track ice cream, a favorite. “I’d come back just for it,” she sighed regretfully.

I’m sorry we hadn’t asked for a soup. There’s chicken, vegetable and watercress (doesn’t that sound good!) daily and consommé, Saturday only. On Sunday it’s squash (pumpkin) soup, the No. 1 favorite. I would have liked to try a beef or chicken patty or the pate with cod, beef or chicken filling in a French pastry dough, but we arrived at 7:30 p.m. and all were standing room only.

Take-out bakery samplings were: a rectangle of dense bread pudding; a mini, cellophane wrapped, 2x4 pound cake; four meringue-like cookies stacked in cellophane, prettily tied with a topknot; an incredible, baseball mitt-sized whirligig of cinnamon and sugar; and an incredible, delectable, breakfast “sinker.” Winners, all.

Breakfast is omelets, French toast and oatmeal. Lunch is chicken wings and fries, fish sandwiches, fish and chips and macaroni and cheese.

So, if you have a hankering for Southern/West Indian oxtails, broiled spicy fish, fried goat or BBQ wings, come on over.

The Bottom Line

A newly opened, Southern/West Indian restaurant/bakery. Eat in, take out seven days for breakfast, lunch and supper. Bright and shining. Most attractive with very pleasant staff.


229-10 Linden Blvd.

Cambria Heights


Fax 718-276-8188

Chef’s Choice

(All dinners include rice & salad)

Squash Soup...$2.99/$3.99


B-B-Q Chicken...$7

BBQ Ribs...$10

Turkey Wings...$7

Mac & Cheese...$.99

Potato Salad...$1.99

Fried Plantains...$.99

Bread Pudding...$2

Baguette Bread...$1

Sour Sop Gourmet Drink...$3

Cucumber Gourmet Drink...$3

Cuisine: Southern/West Indian

Setting: Eat-in/takeout restaurant/bakery

Service: Very pleasant

Hours: B,L,D, 7 days

Parking: Street

Location: S side, 4 blocks E of Cross Island

Dress: Casual

Credit cards: All major

Children: Hamburgers, mac & cheese

Takeout: Yes

Private parties: None too small

Off-premise catering: Yes

Noise level: Crowded Fri & Sat night

Handicap access: Yes

Today’s news:
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook

Get our stories in your inbox, free.

Like TimesLedger on Facebook.

Reader Feedback

Enter your comment below

By submitting this comment, you agree to the following terms:

You agree that you, and not or its affiliates, are fully responsible for the content that you post. You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening or sexually-oriented material or any material that may violate applicable law; doing so may lead to the removal of your post and to your being permanently banned from posting to the site. You grant to the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual and fully sublicensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part world-wide and to incorporate it in other works in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

CNG: Community Newspaper Group