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Cops find weapons stash on apartment roof

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"You can categorize this as an anomaly," said Capt. Scott Shanley, commander of the 114th Precinct. "It's not something you expect."The probe started Sunday at 4 a.m., when Julio Negron, 35, a custodian in a Brooklyn school, allegedly shot a man in the leg during an argument at Woodword and Menahan Streets, police said. The victim, Marvin Fevrier, 30, alerted officers on patrol a short distance away, Shanley told a news conference in the precinct headquarters Monday. After police arrested Negron at his apartment at 583 Woodward Ave., neighbors told them that someone tried to get onto the roof of the building from next door at 585 Woodward Ave., Shanley said. Following the lead, police found the stash of weapons and other items in plastic bags on the roof of 583 Woodward Ave. Police found a 12-gauge shotgun, an AR 15 semi-automatic rifle, five handguns, two bulletproof vests, dozens of rounds of ammunition, two fake police badges, handcuffs and $10,000 in fake $20 bills, according to Shanley.Police said they also discovered several ornamental axes, pepper spray canisters and knives in Negron's second-floor apartment. "It's too early to determine what they used it for," Shanley said. "To take these guns off the street is a real plus for us."Police charged two of Negron's downstairs neighbors, Fernando Caban, 36, and Monica Guartan, 28, with criminal possession of weapons. They were arraigned Tuesday in Queens Criminal Court. Bail was set at $1,000 for Guartan, who faces seven years in prison if convicted. Caban, who faces 15 years in prison if convicted, was remanded without bail because of a prior criminal charge, a spokeswoman with the DA's office said. Negron, who was charged with attempted murder, first-degree assault, reckless endangerment and criminal possession of weapons, faces 25 years in prison if convicted. A judge set bail at $150,000 and gave him a return date of Feb. 10.The U.S. Secret Service was investigating the fake money, which was printed on regular computer paper, and it was too early to tell if the suspects used the fake badges to impersonate police, Shanley said. Reach reporter Matthew Monks by e-mail at news@timesledger.com or by phone at 718-229-0300, Ext. 156.

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