Sections

South Queens Speaks: Queens loves cell phones, but are they really safe?

Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Get our stories in your inbox, free.

Like TimesLedger on Facebook.

There are approximately 80 cell phone stores in the south Queens vicinity and with more than 100 million cellular phone users in the United States, stores and rooftop cell antennae are on the rise. International and national studies, which I will discuss below, have proved that the links between the radiation that is emitted by cell antennae and cell phones can be carcinogenic and cause other ill effects. Ozone Park resident Grace D'Agostino said that she has been using a Samsung cell phone for eight years, but only about four hours per week. She said that she does not feel any headaches or other effects. However, she believes that long-term constant usage, with holding the phone to your head can be a danger. One Howard Beach resident who asked not to be named said she has had a negative experience with long-term usage, which recently made her cut back on her cell phone calls. She said she was getting severe headaches and her ear was burning on the side where she used the cell phone. Since cutting back on use, she said she is feeling better.Scientist Dr. Martin Blank, associate professor of physiology and cellular biophysics at Columbia University in Manhattan has been researching electro-magnetic fields, known as EMF, and radio-frequency radiation, which is emitted from cell phones and antennae for over 20 years. He researched and found out that the cells in our body react to EMF as potentially harmful. The Global System for Mobile Communication is connected with an increase in brain tumors, seizures and headaches, according to a study published in the June 2001 issue of The Lancet medical journal. The report also states that other effects can also exist, including: sleep disruption, cysts, cataracts and tumors of the ear and jaw. A recent 1010 News report said that health studies proved that men who wear cell phones on their waist or hip, turned on are at a higher risk for infertility problems and a low sperm count. In addition, multiple studies have been conducted in Canada, Europe and Switzerland, which show documented health risks; however, the FCC recently said that the United States does not have the funding for such studies. One such study at the University of Turko in Finland conducted in November 2003 said that exposure to an active mobile phone decreases regional cerebral blood flow bilaterally in the auditory cortex of the brain. In New Zealand cell phone towers are prohibited on school property because of possible health effects. One opposing view is from Amy DiLeo, director of media relations for the American Cancer Society who pointed out that according to FCC standards, the amount of radiation emitted from cell antennae is not harmful, but she then suggested that there is not enough evidence to make that information conclusive. On Aug. 12, 2005, Manhattan Councilwoman Eva Moskowitz posted a list of over 400 types of cell phones that have the worst and best SAR (specific absorption rate). This rate determines how much radiation gets absorbed in the body's cells. In 1996 the federal government set a maximum level of cell phone radiation that could be safely absorbed in the body, which was set at 1.6 watts per kilogram; however, several Motorola phones measured 1.58 and 1.59 watts per kilogram, which are above the standard rate. Moskowitz also asked that cellular phone companies put SAR listings on the phones as well as the packaging. This information can be accessed at www.nyccouncil.info/. Use precaution when using a cell phone. By using a speakerphone, headset, cutting down on usage and buying a phone with a low SAR rate can decrease possible ill effects. Regardless of your stance on cell phones, one fact holds true: More independent health studies, which can take eight to 10 years for accurate results, are needed.

Today’s news:
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Get our stories in your inbox, free.

Like TimesLedger on Facebook.

Reader Feedback

Enter your comment below

By submitting this comment, you agree to the following terms:

You agree that you, and not TimesLedger.com or its affiliates, are fully responsible for the content that you post. You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening or sexually-oriented material or any material that may violate applicable law; doing so may lead to the removal of your post and to your being permanently banned from posting to the site. You grant to TimesLedger.com the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual and fully sublicensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part world-wide and to incorporate it in other works in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

This week’s featured advertisers

See all ads
CNG: Community Newspaper Group