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Should Not Need A Law

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Common sense should tell people it is dangerous to use cell phones to send text messages while behind the wheel.

A study released by the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute concludes that texting while driving increased truck drivers’ risk of crashing by more than 23 times. That study and others have prompted U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer to introduce legislation that would make it a federal crime to send text messages while driving a bus.

If your bus driver is texting on his BlackBerry while driving, he is putting your life at risk.

On Wednesday, Schumer raised the stakes by introducing legislation that would force all states to ban texting while driving any vehicle or face cuts in federal highway funds. At least one major wireless carrier, Verizon, is backing this legislation.

Although we are uncomfortable with legislation that tramples on states’ rights, we are convinced Schumer’s effort deserves support. No one can text and give the highway the attention it deserves.

The temptation to text or talk on a cell phone while driving is enormous — especially for younger drivers. It is also dangerous. The ban on using electronic devices while driving should be expanded and enforced.

Posted 6:32 pm, October 10, 2011
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