Sections

Kew Gdns. opposes Q10 bus changes

Joseph Raskin discusses various route options for Q10 buses. Photo by Sarina Trangle
TimesLedger Newspapers
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Get our stories in your inbox, free.

Like TimesLedger on Facebook.

MTA’s plans to tweak the Q10 bus route and fleet have gained little traction in Kew Gardens.

Community Board 9’s Transportation Committee invited Metropolitan Transportation Authority officials to its Tuesday meeting after lambasting the MTA’s plans to have all three Q10 bus routes — the regular, the limited and the “short trip” that ends before JFK Airport — stop on Kew Gardens Road between 80th Road and 82nd Avenue as a bid to turn the residential strip into a bus terminal.

They also railed against stocking the Q10 fleet with articulated buses — often called double or accordion buses because of their extended length — which neighbors said take away parking spots, clog traffic and struggle to turn on tight street corners.

“We’re a very small community. We’re a village. We’re not a throughway or a terminus,” said Renee Levine, who lives on 82nd Avenue near Kew Gardens Road, noting that traffic already threatens the balance of the neighborhood. “The traffic in the morning coming down my block extends from Austin Street all the way down. They’re lined up.”

Albert Lai, director of service design and operation design at MTA, came with revised plans for the Q10 route, which runs from John F. Kennedy International Airport up to the civic center of the borough on Queens Boulevard.

Lai said the MTA currently planned to have buses travel up Lefferts Boulevard, turn left onto Kew Gardens Road, drop off passengers near 80th Road, rest for up to 10 minutes between shifts and head up to Queens Boulevard, where new riders would board the bus. The Q10 would then travel along 82nd en route to Kew Gardens Road and Lefferts Boulevard. Lai said this setup would alleviate congestion concerns raised by the community while also easing the commute for riders, who would no longer have to wait for various Q10 buses on Kew Gardens Road and Queens Boulevard.

“Passengers would be waiting along the same thoroughfare so they could see which buses are coming and make a more knowledgeable decision on the bus they’re going to get on,” he said.

CB 9 Transportation Committee Chairwoman Andrea Crawford said the revisions made sense, but requested that the MTA do more research and make tweaks after residents worried about buses traveling near PS 99 or overwhelming the northern stretch of Lefferts Boulevard.

The MTA agreed to return to CB 9, but noted that it intended to alter the route as quickly as possible.

But MTA officials said transitioning to articulated buses in April remained a necessity because Q10 buses were overcrowded. Joseph Raskin, assistant director of MTA government-community relations, said the Q10 was the third most popular bus line in the city.

Crawford said she requested ridership statistics after noticing several nearly empty articulated buses, but never received them.

“There’s got to be a different solution,” she said. “Besides the fact that they’re the old, dirty, stinky buses that we got rid of ... they’re taking away parking spots and the merchants are losing business because of it.”

The MTA estimated roughly seven parking spots were lost when bus stops were enlarged to accommodate articulated buses.

Reach reporter Sarina Trangle at 718-260-4546 or by e-mail at strangle@cnglocal.com.

Posted 12:00 am, March 31, 2014
Today’s news:
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Get our stories in your inbox, free.

Like TimesLedger on Facebook.

Reader feedback

Philip McManus from Rockaway Park says:
The NIMBYS don't want articulated buses? This is outrageous. 25,000 people plus most of Queens are hostages to NIMBYS.
Queens needs to reduce overcrowded, dangerous and unreliable roadways, buses and trains. But the NIMBYS don't care. The NIMBYS want to reduce traffic in their neighborhoods but they don't want longer buses or reuse the Queens Rockaway Beach Line, the new Queens Crosstown. The NIMBYS hate and fear outsiders including you and me. The NIMBYS are killing the people of Queens with unnecessary traffic, pollution, excessive travel times, stress, disease, accident injuries and fatalities, increase emergency response times, unemployment, crime, economic stagnation and decline.
Why does it take 2 1/2 hours to go from Rockaway to Bayside by public transportation? The NIMBYS don't want public transit in their neighborhoods.

This is crazy and it must change.

Philip McManus
Queens Public Transit Committee

718-474-0315

718-679-5309

rowing612@aol.com

https://m.facebook.com/RockawayBeachRailLine?id=100952823448998&refsrc=http://www.google.com/&_rdr

Twitter.com/RBL1910

http://rockawaybranchline.blogspot.com/2013/09/the-queens-public-transit-committee-for.html?m=1

www.QueensPublicTransit.com
April 9, 2014, 10:03 pm
ramsey maharaj from 150 avenue/lefferts blvd. says:
the limited bus at 11pm and 1130pm was cancelled. there was no signs or notice posted at kew gardens informing passengers of changes. also i would like to know what bus i should take to reach 150 ave. and lefferts blvd at11pm from kew gardens. thank you.
April 28, 2014, 8:57 am

Enter your comment below

By submitting this comment, you agree to the following terms:

You agree that you, and not TimesLedger.com or its affiliates, are fully responsible for the content that you post. You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening or sexually-oriented material or any material that may violate applicable law; doing so may lead to the removal of your post and to your being permanently banned from posting to the site. You grant to TimesLedger.com the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual and fully sublicensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part world-wide and to incorporate it in other works in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

Community News Group