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Historic District Council hopes to protect Forest Close’s architecture

The Forest Close Association uses restrictive covenants to regulate the look of the 38 neo-Tudor homes. Photo by Christina Santucci
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The Historic Districts Council has named Forest Close one of its six preservation priorities for 2014.

The council, which advocates to maintain historic buildings and neighborhoods, announced Jan. 9 that it had selected the six areas from applications submitted by neighborhood groups across the city. The priorities were picked based on the architectural and historic merit of the area, the threat posed to buildings or communities and the strength of local advocates.

The council said it sought to get involved where its assistance would be most meaningful.

The Forest Close Association uses restrictive covenants to regulate the design of Forest Close, a collection of 38 neo-Tudor houses with a shared communal garden in Forest Hills. HDC said the association is researching other tools that may help in protecting the community’s character.

HDC said it planned to work with the association to plan, advocate and publicize its goals of preserving Forest Close.

The council will formally introduce its priorities Jan. 29, at the LGBT Community Center in Manhattan, from 6 to 8 p.m.

Reach reporter Sarina Trangle at 718-260-4546 or by e-mail at strangle@cnglocal.com.

Updated 3:01 pm, January 20, 2014
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Reader feedback

al from rh says:
How I wish that Richmond Hill, with all of its' over one hundred and plus year homes and beautiful Victorian homes would be Historically Preserved.

The destruction of the architectural distinction of Richmond Hill is an ongoing situation.
Jan. 20, 2014, 10:54 am
Kenneth Kowald from I Sit and Look Out says:
I agree. Elaine and I lived on Park Lane South for decades and we know of many wonderful buildings in Richmond Hill.
Another point: What about Arbor Close in Forest Hills? Also worth protecting.

Kenneth Kowald
Jan. 20, 2014, 11:07 am

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