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Ferrigno House in Broadway-Flushing on the market

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A couple of families have expressed serious interest in buying the landmarked Ferrigno House in the Broadway-Flushing Historic District.

The Ferrigno House at 33-37 163rd St., inhabited by Nicholas and Marjorie Ferrigno, founding members of the Broadway-Flushing Homeowners Association, is up for sale, according to Paul Halvatzis, a broker for Amorelli Realty, which is representing the property. The asking price for the property is $849,000.

Four families are interested in the property, Halvatzis said. One of those families, from Queens, is in direct negotiations to buy the house, but the deal has not yet been consummated, he said. The house was still being shown to potential buyers.

He said the family appreciates the old-fashioned nature of the house and is willing to do what needs to be done to restore it.

“I believe that they love the character and charm of the house and appreciate the uniqueness,” he said.

Built in 1923, the house, which sits on 0.19 acres, has eight rooms, three of which are bedrooms and 1 1/2 bathrooms.

The house was owned by the Ferrignos, who lived there for about 50 years. The Ferrignos were founding members of the Broadway-Flushing Homeowners Association and played a key role in the establishment of the Broadway-Flushing Historic District. Nicholas Ferrigno died in 2010, while Marjorie died in 2013.

The Ferrignos gave the property to the National Trust for Historic Preservation, a nonprofit based in Washington, D.C., to ensure its preservation. In late 2014, the nonprofit assumed ownership of the property.

The National Trust protects the property through the use of a legal tool known as a preservation easement, which is also called a covenant or restriction.

The easement for the Ferrigno House mandates that the property is maintained, that the property cannot be demolished and that certain interior and exterior architectural features must be retained, although the house does need some updating.

Shantia Anderheggen, National Trust’s director of easement, said the nonprofit selected Amorelli Realty because the company has experience dealing with historic buildings and because Halvatzis recognized that it was a special property.

The company, which has been in existence since the 1970s, has handled the sale of the Steinway Mansion and the DeRosa Pharmacy. Last year, the company put more than $75 million in sales into contracts.

Anderheggen said both the future owner and the nonprofit will benefit equally from the arrangement.

“It’s kind of a win-win. We get preservation of the building and the owner gets access to a lot of help in terms of historic preservation practice and resources because that’s what we do,” she said.

Reach reporter Madina Toure by e-mail at mtoure@cnglocal.com or by phone at (718) 260–4566.

Posted 12:00 am, March 27, 2015
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Reader feedback

anon from queens says:
More asian crap will take over it....believe me it won't stay as beautiful as it is for long! Soon it'll be turned to asian crap and 5 families Will live in it!
March 27, 2015, 4:50 am
read read from Queens says:
To anon - it says above that they cannot demolish it and build a McMansion Pagoda house that uses every square foot of the lot! But maybe they will build a McM next to it and attach the two and have 8 minivans in front.
March 27, 2015, 10:48 am
read read from Queens says:
To anon - it says above that they cannot demolish it and build a McMansion Pagoda house that uses every square foot of the lot! But maybe they will build a McM next to it and attach the two and have 8 minivans in front.
March 27, 2015, 10:48 am
NMar from Flushing says:
NYC Building Dept should come up with standards and regulations to preserve neighborhoods with historic houses, e.g. Tudor buildings, etc. It's are real shame that other cities like those in Europe are able to maintain a certain look while here in Queens these historic looking houses are demolished to build multiple dwelling or tacky McMansions with stainless steel fences, window guardrails and metal stormdoors that look like it's from another planet, let alone another country. Who in the building dept approves these plans? I understand multicultural tastes but it shouldn't be left to developers who are in it just for the money. We end up with a hodgepodge of houses that look like neighborhoods from developing countries. Can you imagine if San Francisco proper allowed these ugly houses to be built? Shame on you NYC Building Department!!
April 2, 2015, 9:29 am

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