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DEC plans to investigate dry cleaners

The state’s Department of Environmental Conservation wants to investigate Clearview Cleaners for environmental contamination.
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The state’s Department of Environmental Conservation has invited the public to comment on a draft plan to have the Clearview Cleaners located in Hollis investigated for what it deems is a brownfield site and cleaned up.

A brownfield site is any property where a contaminant is present at levels exceeding the health-based or environmental standards setby the DEC.

The cleaners is located at 202-16 Hillside Ave. and the public has until Dec. 27 to submit comments to Kerry Maloney from the DEC, who is responsible for project-related matters, and Arunesh Ghosh from the New York State Department for site-related health worries.

The site is a one-story commercial dry cleaners with parking, which is open for business and has approximately 9,838 square feet, according to the DEC.

The building itself is approximately 3,500 square feet and it is surrounded by a shopping center as well as two-story buildings, which are both commercial and residential.

The proposed investigation will define the nature and extent of contamination in soil, surface water, groundwater and any other parts of the environment affected by getting soil and air samples surrounding the site, according to DEC. The cleaners is approximately six miles northeast of Jamaica Bay.

The DEC will also screen shallow waters on the site for its Brownfield Cleanup Program.

The purpose of the program is to encourage private-sector cleanups and to promote redevelopment to revitalize economically strained communities, according to www.dec.ny.gov.

To do the investigation the DEC will have to make 16 installations throughout the site and nearby area to gather the samples.

After getting public comments the DEC will investigate, create a cleanup plan and decide whether any action is necessary to take at the site.

If it is determined that action needs to be taken to ensure the protection of public health and the environment, the DEC will make its work plan available to the public and once approved it could take 8 months to complete per their projections.

To stay informed about the project the public can find project documents located at the Hollis Branch of Queens Library and at Community Board 12 in Jamaica.

Reach reporter Naeisha Rose by e-mail at nrose@cnglocal.com or by phone at (718) 260–4573.

Posted 12:00 am, December 4, 2017
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