Sections

New antioxidant helps slow aging process

Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Get our stories in your inbox, free.

Like TimesLedger on Facebook.

Much of our aging is the result of oxidative stress-cell damage caused by free radicals (highly reactive molecules). Just as rust weakens bare metal, cell oxidation contributes to cardiovascular disease, tumor growth, neurodegenerative diseases, wrinkled skin and even a decline in energy and endurance.

Studies show that astaxanthin, a powerful new antioxidant, is superior to many other well-known antioxidants in preventing oxidative damage. Astaxanthin reportedly traps more types of destructive free radicals than any other antioxidant.

Researchers have discovered that the most abundant and concentrated form of astaxanthin is found in a natural, renewable microalgae grown in Hawaii. One extraction method produces a standardized extract containing 10 percent active astaxanthin—the highest concentration currently available. Consumers can find this extract in many health food stores and leading chain drug stores as astazanthin brand astaxanthin complex.

Astaxanthin naturally appears all around us in the marine world. It’s what creates the pink color in shellfish and in the flesh of salmon. In fact, farm-raised salmon have white flesh unless they are fed astaxanthin. Until recently, eating shellfish or salmon was the only way for humans to get a dose of this powerful antioxidant.

Several human clinical trials involving astaxanthin have shown amazing results. A recent double-blind, placebo-controlled study demonstrated that astaxanthin greatly increased strength and endurance up to three times as much as the placebo when compared to the level prior to the start of the study.

In animal studies, astaxanthin was shown to provide benefit in neurodegenerative diseases, such as eye conditions, stroke, cancer, a weakened immune system and overall infection. Other studies have revealed this antioxidant to inhibit bladder and colon cancer, and to slow the development of liver cancer in animal models.

Furthermore, researchers have demonstrated that astaxanthin has 10 times more antioxidant capacity than beta-carotene and is 100 to 500 times more effective in slowing damage to cell membranes than vitamin E. This makes astaxanthin a stronger weapon in the battle against free radicals and the many age-related diseases associated with them. Studies also show that astaxanthin is bioavailable and safe, with no known side effects.

Unlike other antioxidants, astazanthin performs three primary antioxidant tasks: quenching, scavenging and trapping free radicals.

Doctors have found astazanthin has a unique molecular structure which allows the molecule to cross the blood-brain barrier, thus making it available to the eye, brain and central nervous system. The crossing of the blood-brain barrier further helps alleviate oxidative stress. Doctors also note astaxanthin inhibits destruction of fatty acids and proteins in the cell membranes and mitochondria, the powerhouse of each cell.

Astaxanthin inhibits the free oxygen radicals that can cause inflammation, and serves as a bridge to transport free radicals to the outside of each cell, making them available to water-soluble antioxidants, such as vitamin C. The other unique quality of astaxanthin is that it stabilizes free radicals by absorbing them into its molecular structure.

Several companies, including Health Plus, Inc., a manufacturing leader of body cleansing products, have now formulated astazanthin into their new supplement line. For an informative brochure, call 800-344-2020, ext. 126, or visit www.healthplusinc.com.

Posted 7:16 pm, October 10, 2011
Today’s news:
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Get our stories in your inbox, free.

Like TimesLedger on Facebook.

Reader feedback

Enter your comment below

By submitting this comment, you agree to the following terms:

You agree that you, and not TimesLedger.com or its affiliates, are fully responsible for the content that you post. You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening or sexually-oriented material or any material that may violate applicable law; doing so may lead to the removal of your post and to your being permanently banned from posting to the site. You grant to TimesLedger.com the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual and fully sublicensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part world-wide and to incorporate it in other works in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

Community News Group