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Neighbor to Neighbor: Anti-crime event to be held at Belmont Park

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As autumn is generally known as the gathering of the harvest, late spring and summer often inspires the gathering of friends, family and neighbors whom we might like to know better. A “harvest” of compatible people contributes positively to one’s life as much as does food for the body.

Some of us who live, work or do volunteer projects in Rosedale began that joyful season by sharing in the beautiful and impressive celebration of the 35th anniversary of the ordination of the Very Rev. Aubrey Nelson Bougher to the ministry of the Lutheran Church.

Bougher and Maureen, his wife of five years, are well-known and loved by many in this area since they and their church family always are doing good works, sharing their facilities for community activities and generally becoming an important part of many extended families — Lutheran and non-Lutheran alike.

We are all grateful for their presence, their advice and other help. (We were happy to celebrate with them the 90th anniversary and refurbishing of Rosedale’s Christ Lutheran Church in May.) The ceremony itself was very impressive.

The music and pageantry were enhanced not only by the church’s “new at 90” look, but by members of the congregation at the altar and by participation by Bougher; the Rev. Charles Albert Wagarnan; and the Right Rev. Charles George Fry, missionary bishop, the International Lutheran Fellowship, as well as bishop in the Southern Episcopal Church.

Also participating were the Right Rev. Richard Johnson, bishop of the Southern Ministerium, the International Lutheran Fellowship, and bishop in the Southern Episcopal Church; Deacon Samnarain Sooppersaud; Deacon Sevika Sooppersaud; the Very Rev. Terrence Weber; and Isabelle Coles-Dunbar, president of the Congregation Loci.

Also attending were Monsignor James Cooney, pastor of St. Clare’s Roman Catholic Church; Monsignor Thomas Graham, pastor of St. Pius X Roman Catholic Church; and the Rev. Andrew Robin, former pastor of Epiphany Lutheran Church, now retired. The joyous, sacred ceremony was followed by a sumptuous feast and fellowship.

Jim English, chairman of the Rosedale Civic Association, entertained us at our table, relating a story he found on the Internet. It went something like this: A woman was about to give birth during a power failure. She called her doctor and asked him to come right over, since the only one at home with her was her 3-year-old daughter.

The doctor responded immediately. He lit his flashlight, handed it to the little girl and told her that she should hold it just where he told her so that she could help him help her mommy give her a baby brother or sister. Her baby brother was born quickly. The doctor turned him upside-down and smacked his backside, making him cry.

Everything went well, so he handed the baby to the mother. He then turned to the 3-year-old and asked, “What did you think of that?”

She thought for a minute and then said, “I think you better whack him again. He had no business crawling in there in the first place.” Perspective. Each of us has our own.

Every year, the first Tuesday in August, National Night Out Against Crime is celebrated in our country as well as in some others.

This year the date is Aug. 5. We are invited by our police precincts to join and bring family and friends to show support for each other, to share important information and to get to know and understand each other better.

Everything but the food is free, and that is not expensive. You may bring your own non-alcoholic picnic. This year, as in some years past, the 105th Precinct will share National Night not only with us, but with the Nassau County Police Department and possibly others at beautiful Belmont Park. It is a very interesting and enjoyable experience.

The flowered landscaping includes a pond with waterfowl as well as a play area for children. There is music and animals of various kinds to see and to pat. There also is a “smokehouse” that, with parental consent, will help children understand how to cope with smoke in case of a fire. There is fingerprinting and picture-taking of youngsters for parents to hold in case their child is lost or abducted.

And there is dancing, singing, learning, giveaways and surprises. In this year of financial crisis, join us there from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. and skip the expense and inconvenience of block parties and street fairs. Please try it. I think you’ll like it. Save the date — Aug. 5.

Posted 7:13 pm, October 10, 2011
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