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Cuomo Courts Brooklyn Voters In Bid to Become Next Attorney General

If there was something called the political trifecta, this would be it: endorsements from the reigning Democratic parties in Queens, Bronx and Brooklyn. That being said, Attorney General candidate Andrew Cuomo has already accomplished about two thirds of his goal with Brooklyn ripe for the taking. That’s why the son of former Governor Mario Cuomo has been “doing the rounds” at borough political clubs, getting his message across. Just last Thursday, Cuomo was the “special guest speaker” at the Brooklyn Independent Democrats of the 44th Assembly District in Flatbush during a forum for the 11th Congressional Race. During his remarks, the jocular Cuomo announced that he wasn’t running for Attorney General. “I’m running for Congress,” he joked, before touting the record of outgoing Attorney General Eliot Spitzer, who is leaving the office in a bid for Governor. “In this state, the Attorney General has a very important position,” he said as he outlined his campaign platform. “The reason why it’s so important can be credited to one man – Eliot Spitzer.” Once he’s elected to the Attorney General’s office, Cuomo said he would want to continue the work that Spitzer had done investigating the “institutionalized corruption” on Wall Street. “The federal government is supposed to protect its citizens from crimes like the corruption that Spitzer found on Wall Street,” said Cuomo. “When the Federal government is asleep at the wheel, it’s up to the Attorney General to step in.” Cuomo said that he will also “make government in Albany work.” “The New York State government is the most disenfranchised in the United States,” he said. “The Attorney General is going to have to correct it.” Leaning on his record of service as Secretary of Housing and Urban Development under President Bill Clinton and the fact that he has filed over 1,000 anti-discrimination cases during his legal career, Cuomo said that he is highly qualified to be the next Attorney General. “I want to make a difference to people…to help improve people,” he said. “And I believe in getting results.” With the election months away, a wide array of candidates is vying for the Attorney General’s chair. In the city, his biggest Democratic opponent is expected to be former Public Advocate Mark Green, who in the past has always turned to Brooklyn for support in his campaigns. According to published reports, Cuomo has already secured the endorsements of the Queens County Democratic Party and the Bronx Democratic Committee as well as several key unions. Rep. Ed Towns and Assemblymember Darryl Towns have also lent their support to the Cuomo campaign, pulling their support from his challenger Charlie King. According to a recent Sienna College Poll, Cuomo is leading Green, the most viable challenger, 37 percent to 20 percent. Cuomo is also in the lead when put head to head with Westchester County District Attorney Jeanine Pirro, the Republican pick for the site. Poll results show that if the election was taken today, Cuomo would receive 49 percent of the vote. Pirro would receive 36. As of this writing, the Kings County Democratic Party hasn’t endorsed anyone. It is unclear when a vote by the party’s Executive Committee would take place.

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